Health Monitoring Ad Nauseam

Art
So the new Apple Watch promises to monitor our every virtual health status as technology and person blend to become one.  



However, the question raised in the New York Times is whether this level of continuous monitoring is really all that necessary?



“One central rule of doctoring is that you only gather data that will affect your treatment?”



But how can more data hurt you?



- Change in measurements are often normal: For example, “blood pressure jumps up and down in response to thoughts, hydration, and stress.”



- Data sometimes outstrips our ability to understand it:  So collecting more and more data may actually end up concealing the needle in the haystack, rather than culling the crucial piece of evidence we need for a diagnosis and treatment. 



- Data can sometimes belie the underlying truth: “Some patients die with ‘Harvard numbers, [and in others] test results can can look bad even when the patient is fine.”



- Obsessive-compulsive monitoring may actually stress us out: “If you were dieting would stepping on the scale 1,000 times a day help you lose weight?” Perhaps, the stress of monitoring every stat we generate may actually make us sick from fear and worry.  



The point is that as they say, “there can be too much of a good thing”–monitoring and checking is helpful, but not every minute of every day without some intelligent filtering and analysis. 



Perhaps, the technology will evolve to wear the monitoring is unobtrusive and where the artificial intelligence is there to more or less accurately decipher true warning signs from run of the mill changes in bodily functions, and where data is aggregated to get a holistic picture and diagnosis of the person rather than a snapshot of individual functions.



No one can live under a microscope and making ourselves sick with an endless stream of health tracking and worries is not helpful. 



However, in time, the technology will most certainly evolve to where it will be discreet, accurate, and truly lifesaving. ;-)



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Like A Rock Star

Rock Star
It’s funny that people derive so much of their self esteem from others. 



If someone says something nice to/about them, then they feel on top of the world–full of worth, productive, successful, confident.



And when someone says something negative, then they get down in the dumps–depreciated, questioning, can’t do anything right, like a failure.



Yet, it the same person inside–the same heart, the same soul.



Of course, we are impacted by our behavior (when we do good and not) and people’s reactions to it–and we should be–it’s a helpful feedback mechanism to let us know when we are messing up or as reinforcement to continue doing good things. 



But at the same time, people’s feedback is not always correct or well-intentioned and certainly it doesn’t necessarily represent holistically who we are…it’s just a snapshot in time. 



So we need to take what people say and reflect back to us with a grain of salt–listen, try to understand, but also look at the bigger picture of you. 



You know yourself better than anyone else, so incorporate the feedback and use it to improve, but don’t get bogged down by any person, event, or cheap talk.  



Yes, you can be a rock star, by reflecting from what others tell you, but more importantly by listening to that voice inside that guides you. ;-)



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Overqualified And Underwhelming

Better Job
Ok, so this sign is sarcastic for the question I received the other day.



A colleague, who is a supervisor, asked me :



“How do you take a group that doesn’t know how to do the work (literally does not know how) and get them going, then teach them to do it on their own instead of doing nothing, waiting, blaming?”



My response was:



You can’t do everyone’s job for them…you will fail that way (and they will fail that way). 



You have to learn to work effectively with others…you have to delegate and let them do their jobs. 



As a manager, you should review, edit, comment, question, suggest, recommend, and quality assure (not micromanage).



Send staff to training, mentor, and guide them, but don’t do the job for them. 



What do you think?



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Super Military Sentry


Awesome robotic sentry being deployed by South Korea along the DMZ.



Ubergizmo reports that the Samsung SGR-A1 costs just $200,000 and supports all weather detection, a 5.56 mm machine gun, grenade launcher, surface to air missiles, and has an illuminator, laser range finder, heat infrared and motion detection, and can track multiple targets. 


Moreover, the human operator remains safe at a remote command location, while this robot at the front line targets the enemy at over 2 miles away. 



I would think this needs to be augmented with a bunker, camouflage, and/or additional sophisticated anti-air defense system to protect these stationary devices or perhaps add some mobility to these. 



Can you think of other countries that could benefit in protecting their borders from terrorists and military incursions with such a robot? ;-)

Decide To Win

Stop Fighting
This was an interesting sign + sticker in Washington, D.C.



It asks to Stop Fighting Congress or perhaps stop the fighting in Congress.



The point is to come together and collaborate for a better decision, rather than have bad decisions made by just one side or have indecision altogether.



The New York Times had an Op-Ed over the weekend called The Great Unraveling about how we are living amidst hatred, fighting, disintegration, disease, and disorientation. 



And we are watching it as if dazed and confused–paralyzed as a nation taking maybe a baby step here or there, but with seemingly no solid committment to do anything to really change, improve, better, or win. 



Scared by lost lives and treasure since 9/11…we cannot bear to lose or waiver in our resolve because of weariness or despair.



Their is a lot to get done…for ourselves and future generations.



We’ve got to stop fighting our demons and each other and instead face up, man up, to the myriad of global problems that confront us. ;-)



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)