Driving Your Organization Off A Cliff

Cliff.jpeg

So life is generally supposed to be a series a peaks and valleys. 


There are highs, but also lows.  


No one and nothing can perform at peak all the time. 


Like the commandment to keep the Shabbat, everyone needs a rest. 


And studies have shown that getting a healthy dose of sleep, pause, and rest in life is healthy.


When we force ourselves or others to perform past their “designed” limits, then we risk a breakdown. 


Machines break and people can break. 


The risks are either explosion or implosion: some people can frighteningly “go postal” and others end up on psychiatric medication or even sick and in the hospital. 


What is key to remember is that you can push the limits of performance so far, but then no further without a healthy, recuperative rest period and down time. 


If you want to raise the bar on yourself, others, or your organization, you need to do it strategically so there is a surge forward and then a normative recovery and energy buildup again. 


As we all know, life is a marathon and not a sprint, and the journey is as important as the destination. 😉


(Source Photo: here with attribution to Alan Levine)

Less With Less

Less With Less

This was a funny picture of a “Complaint Jar”.

“All complaints must be written on $1.00 bills or larger. Thank you.”

Hey, if you’re going to complain, put your money where you mouth is.

The person on the receiving end isn’t looking for more negativity and insults about the job they are doing–they want compliments and tips!

This is similar to a story I heard today about an executive where he and his team where stretched thin and stressed out.

So at one point, when he was once again asked to do more with less, he slams his fist on the table and says, “No, we are going to do less with less!”

It is interesting that nationally and in our organizations, we are constantly asked to increase productivity, but at the same tighten our belts.

And in the short to intermediate term, we are able to shed “dead weight” and become more efficient.

However, over the longer-term, there does come a breaking point, where trying to do more with less results not in cutting fat, but in cutting bone–and the stress ends up in a fracture.

Before you know it, fists are slamming on desks, absenteeism is going up, people are getting sick, fights–verbal and otherwise–are breaking out at work, poor decisions are being made, fighting for scarce resources become fierce, and collaboration becomes overt warfare, and perhaps, even someone commits suicide or “goes postal.”

Cutting for efficiency can work up to a point, after that all bets are off and you cut at your own and your organization’s risk–then even the complaint jar or suggestion box will be nothing but a broken marquee. 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)