The Hateful, Anti-Semitic New York Times

This is what has become of the garbage New York Times…



Resorting to anti-Semitism, hate, and incitement against the Jewish people and Israel.


This from the New York Times “coincidentally” the same day that a shooting spree took place at a synagogue in California resulting with one women dead, multiple people injured, and the Rabbi losing one or more of his fingers. 



Complete disgrace on the hateful, Anti-Semitic New York Times!



U.S. Department of Justice investigation!!!



Amazing how the alt-left liberals, with the New York Times leading the march of hate, profess to fight against every …phobia and …ism, except of course, against the age-old Anti-Semitism!



How are the New York Times’ disgusting “leadership” going to be held accountable?



For every decent person still out there, please dump your subscription to the garbage New York Times and stand up against the hateful publication that it truly is.



(Source Caricature: The Hateful, Anti-Semitic New York Times)

Answer Injustice With Justice

Justice

So what is amazing about government scandals is not that they happen, because of course, they do. 


But what is amazing is that the American public is frequently denied justice–whether committed under Democratic or Republican administrations.


Maybe this is because the Justice Department is headed by the Attorney General a political appointee of the President, rather than being independent.   


The President oversees all the government agencies in the Executive Branch of the government, including the Department of Justice (DOJ).


When any of the government agencies in the Executive Branch do something wrong, what should happen is that the Department of Justice (including the FBI) would investigate and bring the offenders to justice. 


But instead, a politically motivated President can direct a politicized Justice Department to stand down–and in a sense end up being the “Chief Obstructionist.”


Obviously every agency is headed by political appointees who serve at the pleasure of the President and who further the administration’s vision, but Justice is unique. 


And if you follow the news, I am sure you can think of more than a few examples where Congress has gotten involved to investigate and even request action by DOJ, but yet nothing seems to happen. 


What is disappointing is that we would like to think that every leader is an icon of righteousness, integrity, and propriety, but instead partisan politics can get in the way, and the leader ends up protecting, whitewashing, or covering up the very wrongdoing that needs to be corrected.


The government system cannot work for the people and the country, if it cannot be accountable to them to do the right thing.


The President–no matter what political affiliation–must assure and be perceived as assuring that everyone under his/her watch is doing the right thing. 


And if and when they stray from serving the people of this country, it should be the President who leads the charge to make it right. 


We all would respect a leader that recognizes and course-corrects when things go astray and does it with integrity and justice–that makes a truly great Democracy.  😉


(Source Photo: Rebecca Blumenthal)

Voting Firsts

Gw_with_soda

With voting, this was the first time I’ve ever:

– Voted early–even though it was on the last early voting day.

– Had to wait on any sort of real line to vote–this one was about 30 minutes long!

– Waited outside in the cold on a line snaking around the building–until the election volunteers had a heart and let us all in and out of the cold. 

– Had electioneering occurring right outside at tables and people handing out “information” until maybe 25 feet before the doors of the polling center–in the past, this activity was always kept far away and and they didn’t have the nerve to approach you as you were literally going inside the polling stations. 

– Got to sit down at a voting machine–always had to stand up previously, but from the sitting position and the “ergonomics” of the voting machine, you could hardly see them properly. 

– Had virtually no voting privacy–the machine faced the walls with the touch screens facing inward towards everyone else in the auditorium.

Despite all these voting firsts and most of them disappointing, the one voting first that I would have liked to see and didn’t was Internet voting, where we would usher voting into the 21st century with ease of voting, convenience, and privacy.

For some reason we can bank, shop, and pay taxes online, but to vote, we’re still stuck in the dark ages and it seemed like overall it was getting darker. 

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)