Everyone Participates

Suggestion Box
So very infrequently do suggestion boxes actually work. 



In the office, I remember when the suggestion box was put out and the biggest suggestion put into the box was to bring paper towels back to the bathrooms after these had been replaced months before with hand dryers, so the toilets wouldn’t get clogged up!



Most of the time suggestions boxes like meetings don’t get the participation and input needed. 



Today, in the New York Times, Phil Gilbert says that in the meeting room, “You’ve got the extrovert, the introvert, the know-it-all and the ambitious steamroller. No matter what the mix, there’s always someone who dominates the discussion, and others who defer to that person out of frustration–or worse, complacency.”



Truthfully, I think Gilbert misses the point–most people don’t speak up not out of frustration or complacency–but rather from fear…fear of sounding stupid, fear of people disagreeing with them, and fear of management retribution for saying the”wrong” thing.



In any case, his reflection on how some at IBM deal with this is helpful (although frankly I’ve heard this approach before and it was from a strategic planning class I believe, and not from IBM):



– Everyone writes their input on sticky notes.



– You go around the room where everyone contributes an idea and posts their note to the wall or board (and you keep doing this until ideas are exhausted). 



– The facilitator groups like ideas/sticky notes to start to form common theme and direction. 



– The group may go out and come back again for another round of ideas and input.



The point is everyone contributes to the discussion…no idea is a bad idea…and not one in the room is left to sit idly in the corner playing with their smartphone, daydreaming, or picking their noses. 



Through vetting and discussion, the best idea(s) become evident. 



I like how Gilbert ends his article emphasizing the importance of getting everyone’s ideas out there…”Once you know something, you can’t unknow it–you have to act.”



Knowing what everyone really thinks is half the battle. 



The other half is executing on the really great ideas that people come up with (Gilbert doesn’t address this). 



And again for that you need EVERYONE to contribute their talents…big mouths, naysayers, and do nothings begone! 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Meeting Busters, Come On Play Nice

Meeting

The Wall Street Journal (16 May 2011) had a interesting portrayal this week of the various types of people that tend to spoil meetings.

From low to high on nuisance level, these were as follows:

1) Jokesters–“cracks jokes, appropriate or not.”

2) Ramblers–goes on and on and often off topic.

3) Dominators–dictates to others with their opinions.

4) Naysayers–derails progress with negativity.

5) Plotters–passive-aggressive undermines decisions.

From my experience, I would add a few others (in no particular order):

6) Politicians–focuses on coming away looking good instead of on resolving issues.

7) Positioners–vies for a bigger piece of the pie, whatever flavor it is.

8) Honorees–comes to take all the credit, and politely thank everyone for their support.

9) Bystanders–shows up, but can’t or won’t contribute anything of value.

10) Bewildered–unsure even why they are here, but were told to just show up.

11) Malcontents–they are unhappy and they show it, so who cares anymore.

12) Socializers–shares personal tidbits and whispers about where they want to go lunch or for happy hour afterwards.

For all the meeting attendees out there, life is not a box of cherries, but you don’t have to make it the pits! 😉

(Source Photo: here with attribution to Voka – Kamer van Koophandel Limburg)