Learning Hebrew: One Book at a Time

My daughter had a great idea for improving on our Hebrew language skills.ย 


Start small…as in children’s books.ย 


She got a few of these from the library and it actually was fun to read these.ย 


Aside from taking me back a few years in parenthood and bonding as a family over these, I found it useful to solidify my learning.


Dr. Seuss definitely had the right idea. ๐Ÿ˜‰


(Credit Photo: Andy Blumenthal with attribution to book ๏ฌฑื•ื‘ื™ ื‘ื•ื ื‘ื•ื‘ื™ ืœืš byย ืืžื™ ืจื•ื‘ื™ื ื’ืจ)

Green Eggs and Ham – ื“ื•ืงื˜ื•ืจ ืกื•ืก

So who would’ve thought that Dr. Seuss’s “Green Eggs and Ham” comes in Hebrew.ย 


I watched this video, and loved it!


It is amazing that this can translate over.


One critique that I have is that the book should’ve said that the main character didn’t want to eat the green eggs and ham, because he is kosher (instead of not being hungry or not loving the food).ย ย 


But then again, he would’ve had to stick to his guns and not have eaten it in the end.


One other thing that I learned from this video/book, is that even though I am loving learning Hebrew in Ulpan class, I still have the vocabulary of a 9 year old.ย  LOL


But I’m learning… ๐Ÿ˜‰


(Thank you to my daughter, Rebecca for sharing this with me.)

Amazon Delivery – By Crunk-Car, If You Like

Amazon Delivery - By Crunk-Car, If You Like

Jeff Bezos of Amazon is one very smart guy and when he announces that he is interested in drones delivering your next online order that makes for a lot of grandstanding.

But really how is a dumb drone delivering an order of diapers or a book so exciting.

Aside from putting a lot of delivery people at USPS, UPS, and FedEx out of work, what does the consumer get out of it?

Honestly, I don’t care if if the delivery comes by Zike-Bike, Crunk-Car, Zumble-Zay, Bumble-Boat, or a Gazoom, as Dr. Seuss would say–I just care that it gets here fast, safely, and cheaply.

Will a drone be able to accomplish those things, likely–so great, send the drone over with my next order, but this doesn’t represent the next big technological leap.

It doesn’t give us what the real world of robotics in the future is offering: artificial intelligence, natural language processing, augmentation of humans, or substitution by robots altogether, to do things stronger, faster, and more precisely, and even perhaps companionship to people.

Turning surveillance and attack drones into delivery agents is perhaps a nice gesture to make a weapon into an everyday service provider.

And maybe the Octocopters even help get products to customers within that holy grail, one day timeframe, that all the retailers are scampering for.

It’s certainly a great marketing tool–because it’s got our attention and we’re talking about it.

But I’ll take a humanoid robot sporting a metallic smile that can actually interact with people, solve problems, and perform a multitude of useful everyday functions–whether a caregiver, a bodyguard, or even a virtual friend (e.g. Data from Star Trek)–over a moving thingamajig that Dr. Seuss foresaw for Marvin K. Mooney. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Are You Thing 1 or 2?

Tees

The old Dr Seuss story of The Cat In The Hatย had the crazy part when “Thing 1” and “Thing 2” jump out from under The Cat’s hat and proceed to make a messy house disaster even worse.

Recently, I saw some people wearing the matching type shirts–you know the ones that that generate attention–bright red, with one shirt saying “Thing 1” and the other person’s shirt saying “Thing 2.”
It was cute the way the family members were connected through the shirts, and I smiled to myself thinking, like in the children’s story, which one is the bigger “trouble-maker” in this family–Thing 1 or 2?
Today, I saw this picture online of these twins, again with these matching type t-shirts, but this time, one said “Ctrl + C” and the other one had written on it “Ctrl + V” — these are the well-known Microsoft commands for copy and paste.
I guess with twins, the copy-paste imagery makes a lot of sense–copy kid 1, paste, and there you have it, kid 2.
Generally, t-shirts have messages about peace, rock and roll bands, corporate branding, or satire of some sort–I wouldn’t say it’s exactly a fashion statement, but more of an identity thing–how we choose to brand ourselves in a world of 7 billion people. It’s not necessarily about who we are, but more like how we choose to identify ourselves–a meaningful one for example, is for breast cancer awareness.
I remember as a kid, my sister, who was a budding biomedical scientist, bought me t-shirts from a scientific catalogue–so that I was wearing the Periodic Table and Einstein on my chest from very early on in life. ย While I always did like science too, it was not what I ended up pursuing, but I would still wear these shirts today, because in some ways, I still identify with science and psychology and learning and so on.
These days, if I had to choose some t-shirt themes, I am pretty sure technology and futurism would be in the mix. Then again, my current t-shirts include a hefty mix of Rocky and Everlast–you see identity is a complex subject. Also, a whole bunch came 4 for 10–who can say no to a sale? ๐Ÿ˜‰
A simple t-shirt, and the messaging can take you from Dr. Seuss to Microsoft, the Periodic Table and to the future (or even to the bargain bin).
What are you wearing–who are you?
(Source Photo: here)