Make Up Your Mind

Yes No Maybe

It all started with the Staples “Easy” button that says robotically when pressed, “That was easy!”Β 

Then came the “B.S.” button that yells out, “That was bullsh*t!”

Now we have the decision and indecisional buttons for “Sorry,” “Yes,” “Maybe,” and “No.”

Very much like organizational decision-making and politics where either we can’t make up our minds, hedge our bets because we simply don’t know, or make decisions on imperfect knowledge or with plenty of biases.

It’s funny-sad how instead of decisions and progress, some people lie and pretend that what they are saying has any reality or basis to it despite proof to the compelte opposite.Β 

For example, over and over again, we hear some politicians say there is no military solution in Syria, yet Russia has proved that completely false turning the tides of the war in Assad’s favor and driving back the U.S.-backed rebels and recapturing dozens of towns and cities.

You can probably think of plenty more examples as this is the germy spin that we all must swim and navigate in.Β 

If only, we could just press a “truth” button to get past all the garbage thrown at us then maybe we could get down to business and really get something done. πŸ˜‰

(Source Photo: Dannielle Blumenthal)

The Help Button Is Only A Kiosk Away

Great job by the ANAR (Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk) Foundation in Europe to aid abused children.

The ad is hidden from adults, and the message is only visible to children–based on their height and angle of viewing.

To the abused child, they see: “If someone hurts you, phone us and we’ll help” with a number to call to get help in an anonymous and confidential way.

To the accompanying adult, they see: “Sometimes, child abuse is only visible to the child suffering it.”

This is a great reminder to adults to behave themselves in how they treat children, and a way to get critical assistance information to children discreetly.

Learning from this, I’d love to see a similar campaign here in the U.S. to help child abuse victims, as well as other variations to help abused women, human trafficking victims, and others–by finding technological innovations to help them get the message in ways that their abusers don’t necessarily detect and which can’t easily be blocked from their victims.

Perhaps, one way to do this is to widely deploy emergency, push button, help kiosks where victims can easily reach out for assistance, where otherwise they would have no way to call for help–such as when their phones, money, passports, and so on have been confiscated.

Their are a lot of people hurting out there and we need to get to them to tell them that there is help available, that they will be protected (and mean it), and that they can easily reach out and we’ll be right there for them.

Now that’s an easy button to really help people. πŸ˜‰

What’s Diplomacy Anyway?

What's Diplomacy Anyway?

This was a humorous engraved stone that I found in a gift shop today.

It is a Concord “Words From The Wise,” engraved paperweight, crafted in England.

Diplomacy is generally associated with negotiation, persuasion, consideration, tactfulness, etiquette, and respect. However, this engraved paperweight has a little bit of a different view of it–“The art of letting someone have it your way.”

Diplomacy has traditionally been differentiated from the use of military power in that diplomacy relies on “soft power” (co-opting or winning over cooperation), whereas the military employs “hard power” (coercion). Both are ways of handling relations and resolving conflict.

More recently, some foreign affairs experts have started to use “smart power,” which is situational-based–leveraging alliances and partnerships in some cases and a strong military in others.

In any case, it’s all about working together to bridge differences–and like the “Easy Button” the best way is to maintain a strong relationship, whether you get your way or not. πŸ˜‰

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)