Work Off Of Standards, But Stay Flexible to Change

Modelt

Interesting book review in the Wall Street Journal (18 January 2012) on Standards: Recipes for Reality by Lawrence Busch.

Standards are a fundamental principle of enterprise architecture, and they can mean many things to different people–they can imply what is normal or expected and even what is considered ethical.

Reading and thinking about this book review helped me to summarize in my own mind, the numerous benefits of standards:

Predictability–You get whatever the standard says you get.

Quality–By removing the deviation and defects, you produce a consistently higher quality.

Speed–Taking the decision-making out of the routine production of standardized parts (i.e. we don’t have to “reinvent the wheel each time”), helps us to move the production process along that much faster.

Economy–Standardizing facilitates mass production and economies of scale lowering the cost of goods produced and sold.

Interoperability–Creating standards enables parts from different suppliers to inter-operate and work seamlessly and this has allowed for greater trade and globalization.

Differentiation–Through the standardization of the routine elements, we are able to focus on differentiating other value-add areas for the consumer to appeal to various tastes, styles, and genuine improvements.

While the benefits of standards are many, there are some concerns or risks:

Boring–This is the fear of the Ford Model-T that came in only one color, black–if we standardize too much, then we understate the importance of differentiation and as they say “variety is the spice of life.”

Stagnation–If we over-standardize, then we run the risk of stifling innovation and creativity, because everything has to be just “one way.”

Rigidity–By standardizing and requiring things like 3rd-party certification, we risk becoming so rigid in what we do and produce that we may become inflexible in addressing specific needs or meeting new requirements.

The key then when applying standards is to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks.

This requires maintaining a state of vigilance as to what consumers are looking for and the corollary of what is not important to them or what they are not keen on changing. Moreover, it necessitates using consumer feedback to continuously research and develop improvements to products and services.  Finally, it is important to always be open to introducing changes when you are reasonably confident that the benefits will outweigh the costs of moving away from the accepted standard(s).

While it’s important to work off of a standard, it is critical not to become inflexible to change.

(Source Photo: here)

>Andy Blumenthal Talks about Cloud Computing

>Here is the podcast from MeriTalk Silverlining Series (August 2009)

>Andy’s Cloud Computing Presentation on MeriTalk

>

Introduction

First let me start out by saying that cloud computing brings us closer than ever to providing IT as a utility such as electricity, where users no longer need to know or care about how IT services are provided, and only need to know that they are reliably there, just like turning on the light. This is the subscription approach to using information technology, where base services are hosted, shared, and you pay only for what you need and use.

In cloud computing, there are a number of basic models. First, in public clouds, we have a multi-tenant, shared services environment with access provided over a secure Internet connection. In contrast in a private cloud, the IT shared services is behind the company’s firewall and is controlled by in-house staff. Then, there is also a community cloud, which is an extension of the private cloud, where IT resources are shared by several organizations that make-up a specific community.

The advantage to cloud computing—whether public or private—is that you have a shared, enterprise-wide solution that offers a number of distinct advantages:

  1. Efficiency–with cloud computing, we build once and reuse multiple times—i.e. we share resources—rather than everyone having their own.
  2. Flexibility–we are more nimble and agile when we can quickly expand or contract capacity on-demand, as needed—what some call rapid elasticity. Moreover, by outsourcing the utility computing elements of our IT infrastructure, we can focus our internal efforts on building our core mission areas.
  3. Economy (or economy of scale)–it’s cheaper and more cost effective when we can tap into larger pools of common resources maintained by companies with subject matter expertise. They then are responsible for ensuring that IT products are patched, upgraded and modernized. Moreover, we pay only for what we actually use.

Issue

So cloud computing sounds pretty good, doesn’t it? What then is the big issue? Plain and simple it comes down to—Is cloud computing effective for the organization? And what I mean by that is a few things:

  • First is customization, personalization and service: when you buy IT computing services in this shared services model, do you really get what you need and want – or are you just getting a canned approach, like the Model T that came in one color, black? For example, when you purchase Software as a Service are you getting the solution you need for your agency or the one built for someone else?
  • Next is security, privacy, and disaster recovery. This is a big deal because in a public cloud, you are capturing, processing, sending, and storing data outside of your proprietary infrastructure. This opens the door for theft, manipulation, or other ways of our data being compromised by criminals, cyber-terrorists, and even hostile nation-states.
  • Third, and maybe most important, is cultural, especially in a very individualistic society, like ours, where people are used to getting what they want, when they want, without having to share. For example, we prefer owning our own vacation home to having a time-share. We love the concept of a personal home theater. Everyone now has a personal cell phone, and the old public telephones that were once on every corner are now practically extinct. And most people prefer driving their own cars to work rather than using mass transit—even though it’s not environmentally friendly. So the idea of giving up our proprietary data centers, application systems, the control of our data, in a cloud computing model, is alien to most and possibly even frightening to many.

The Reality

So how do we harmonize the distinct advantages of cloud computing—efficiency, flexibility, and economy—with the issues of customization, security, and culture?

The reality is that regardless of customization issues, we can simply no longer afford for everyone to have their own IT platforms—it’s wasteful. We are recovering from a deep financial recession, the nation has accumulated unprecedented levels of debt, and we are competing in a vast global economy, where others are constantly raising the bar—working faster, better, and cheaper.

Moreover, from a technology standpoint, we have advanced to where it is now possible to build an efficient cloud computing environment using distributed architecture, virtualization/consolidation, and grid computing.

Thirdly, on a cultural level, as individualistic as we are, it is also true that we now recognize the importance of information sharing and collaboration. We are well aware of the fact that we need to break the stovepiped verticals and build and work horizontally. This is exemplified by things like Google Docs, SharePoint, Wikipedia, and more.

In terms of security, I certainly understand people’s concern and it is real. However, we are all already using the cloud. Are you using online banking? Are you ordering things online through Amazon, Overstock or other e-commerce vendors? Do you use yahoo or Google email? Then you are already using the cloud and for most of us, we don’t even realize it. The bottom line on security is that every agency has to decide for itself in terms of its mission and ability to mitigate any risks.

How to Choose

So there are two questions then. Assuming—and I emphasize assuming—that we can solve the security issues with a “Trusted Cloud” that is certified and accredited, can we get over the anxiety of moving towards cloud computing as the new standard? I believe that since the use case—for flexibility, economy, and efficiency—is so compelling, that the answer is going to be a resounding yes.

The next question is, once we accept the need for a cloud computing environment, how do we filter our choices among the many available?

Of course I’m not going to recommend any particular vendor or solution, but what I will do is advocate for using enterprise architecture and sound IT governance as the framework for the decision process.

For too many years, we based our decisions on gut, intuition, politics, and subjective management whim, which is why statistics show that more than 82% of IT projects are failing or seriously challenged.

While a full discussion of the EA and governance process is outside the scope of this talk, I do want to point out that to appropriately evaluate our cloud computing options, we must use a strong framework of architecture planning and capital planning and investment control to ensure the strategic alignment, technical compliance, return on investment, and risk mitigation—including of course security and privacy—necessary for successful implementation.

How Cloud Computing fits with Enterprise Architecture:

As we move to cloud computing, we need to recognize that this is not something completely new, but rather an extension of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) where there are service providers and consumers and applications are built by assembling reusable, shared services that are made available to consumers to search, access, and utilize. Only now with public cloud computing, we are sharing services beyond the enterprise and to include applications, data, and infrastructure.

In terms of a transition strategy, cloud computing is a natural evolution in IT service provision.

At first, we did everything in-house, ourselves—with our own employees, equipment, and facilities. This was generally very expensive in terms of finding and maintaining employees with the right skill sets, and developing and maintaining all our own systems and technology infrastructure, securing it, patching it, upgrading it, and so on.

So then came the hiring of contractors to support our in-house staff; this helped alleviate some of the hiring and training issues on the organization. But it wasn’t enough to make us cost-efficient, especially since we were still managing all our own systems and technologies for our organization, as a stovepipe.

Next, we moved to a managed services model, where we out-sourced vast chunks of our IT—from our helpdesk to desktop support, from data centers to applications development, and even to security and more.

Finally, the realization has emerged that we do not need to provide IT services either with our own or contracted staff, but rather we can rely on IT cloud providers who can offer an array of IT services, on demand, and who will manage our information technology and that of tens, hundreds, and thousands of others and provide it seamlessly over the Internet, so that we all benefit from a more scalable and unified service provision model.

Of course, from a target architecture perspective, cloud computing really hits the mark, because it provides for many of the inherent architecture principles that we are looking to implement, such as: services interoperability and component reuse, and technology standardization, simplification, and cost-efficiency. And on top of all that—using services on a subscription or metered basis is convenient for the end-user.

Just one last thing I would like to point out is that sound enterprise architecture and governance must be user-centric. That means that we only build decision products that are valuable and actionable to our users—no more ivory tower efforts or developing shelfware. We need to get the right information to the right decision makers to get the mission accomplished with the best, most agile and economical support framework available.