Adversity Is Not What You Think

This TEDx video is truly WOW!


Definitely worth watching in full.  


So many takeaways from this that I want to remember.


– Three things can happen in life:


1. What you hope will happen


2. What you fear will happen


3. What actually happens


– There is not always a tomorrow!


Think if you were paralyzed from the neck down, what would you wish you had done differently, and go do it.


– See adversity as a gift:


1. It is harsh and ruthless.


2. It shows up unannounced.


3. It doesn’t care what you want.


4. It doesn’t give a darn how you feel.


5. It doesn’t take no for an answer.


6. It hates your weakness.


7. It is your best teacher.


8. It is the most honest person you will ever encounter.


9. It forces you to up your game.


10. It knows your true potential even if you don’t.


11. It offers you no other choice, so the choice is simple.


12. At the end of the day, we are only as strong as the adversity we overcome!


13. It will recede, but the lessons will always remain.


14. It will strengthen you to endure your next battle, stronger and wiser than before.


15. How we overcome adversity is by facing it head on. (If you try to avoid it, it can crush you; and if you try to go around it, you will never avoid it’s grasp.)


My absolute congratulations and gratitude to Marcus Aurelius Anderson on this magnificent and brilliant talk and lessons for all of us!


And thank you Minna Blumenthal for sharing this wisdom with me!

At Peace Amidst Suffering

Buddha - DC Folk Festival
There is something very smart about Buddhist-thinking. 



(And frankly IMHO, can conceptually mesh very well with Judaism.)



Buddhists nobly accept that life is very much about suffering. 



That greed and evil cause human suffering.



And that we need to reflect, repent, learn, and grow from this as human being with spiritual souls inside us. 



Moreover, that we should have compassion on others, understanding their suffering, even as we experience or remember our own (may G-d have mercy).



This photo taken by at the DC Folk Festival captures well the suffering all around us.



At times, it seems that we are under attack from all sides. 



But like the Buddha at the center, we must submit ourselves to our maker, endure and work to be at peace with ourselves and our surroundings–and to help others achieve the same. 



Yes, maybe a lot easier said then done especially when we are in the throes of it all, but what a noble life we can live and go to the other side with, if we can but learn this. 😉 



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)