Uh-Oh Trouble

Uh-Oh Trouble

So I’m “middle age”…and all of a sudden the last few months I am having trouble reading.

I haven’t worn glasses for over 14 years–since I had the Lasik procedure done.

Now, at the optometrist, he tells me, “Oh everyone ends up getting glasses whether you had Lasik or not.”

He says: “Usually, people need reading glasses starting between the ages of 42-45.”

Crud…back to those darn things again.

I remember in 1999 when I had Lasik, it was still a pretty new procedure, but my best friend and his wife had just gotten it and convinced me to go for it too.

Well, it wasn’t what I expected and when they clamped my eye open and the doctor tells me to stare at a the little red light as the laser comes up to my eye…I was thinking to myself…this is NUTS!

But it actually went from bad to worse.

As the doctor starts working on the first eye, all of a sudden, he goes, “Uh-oh!”

What type of doctor is this that says oh-uh, and what in G-d’s name did he do to me.

Well, he composes himself after pulling away and finishes, but then stops and says he’ll talk to me afterwards.

As it turns out, as he pulled on the eye, something called the epithelium, a piece suddenly flaked off the eye.

Nothing seriously actually happened–no ill sides effects, but those 2 words while under the laser, “Uh-oh,” really sent the shivers up my spine.

Let’s just say, while I am glad I didn’t have to wear glasses these last 14 years, the experience was a little traumatic.

I remember one other time in my life–when I experienced the Uh-oh moment–this time, I was actually the one uttering the Uh-oh.

It was right after I got married, and we had this cool idea that I would give my wife a haircut.

So, I start cutting and I’m thinking hey, this isn’t so hard…and it’s fun…and we also get to save money (hey, we were just starting out in life).

Then, I keep cutting and cutting not realizing how much I was taking off…at one point, my wife starts getting antsy and she says, “So how’s it going (knowing that something wasn’t right)?”

Then it hits me, I suddenly blurt out the big “Uh-oh!

My wife goes, “What did you do?”

Of course, I started to worry and couldn’t get myself to really say and instead I just start cracking up.

Then she knew I had really messed up…and boy was I in trouble then.

Uh-oh is a phase you never want to hear or say…it means trouble has arrived. ๐Ÿ˜‰

When The Solution Is Worse Than The Problem

When The Solution Is Worse Than The Problem

Not to be crude, but we had some clogged plumbing over the weekend.

We tried everything to get it working again–plunger, snake, and even some septic tank treatment.

Nothing seemed to work, so at one point, my wife looked up on the Internet what to do, and it said to unwind a hanger and try that.

Well this turned out to be a huge mistake and I must’ve gotten too close to the chemical fumes–my eyes were burning.

I ended up in the ER with my eyes being flushed for close to 2 hours.

Afterwards, being very supportive and sitting with me in the hospital with my eyeballs hooked to suction cups and saline solution, my wife says to me, “This is a case when the solution (i.e. the results of our trying to fix the plumbing ourselves) is worse then the problem (the clog).”

I thought to myself boy was she right, and while it is good to be self-sufficient and try to fix and improve things ourselves, it is also good to know when to leave it to the experts.

How many times do we foolishly try to do something where “we are out of our league,” and actually can end up doing more harm then good.

In this case, I could have seriously damaged my eyes–permanently–and am so grateful to G-d that everything turned out okay.

Knowing our limits and accurately assessing risks can help us to know when to proceed ourselves and when to ask for some expert assistance.

It’s good do things for yourself and to try your best, but also value and know when to leverage other people’s strengths.

With my eyes irritated and burning and being flushed out for what seemed like an eternity, I had some serious time to ponder what can happen when things go wrong.

Years ago, I learned to “Hope (and pray) for the best, but prepare for the worst,” and I want to continue to work and improve on both these. ๐Ÿ˜‰

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

>Apps for Mobile Health Care

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Talking about apps for your phoneโ€ฆthis one is amazing from MIT Media Labs.

Attach a $1-2 eyepiece (the “NETRA”) to your phone and get your eye prescription in less than 2 minutes.

What’s next?

I wonder if they will come out with more apps for health and wellbeing that check your vital signs such as temperature, pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and more.

I can envision the smartphone becoming our personal health assistant for monitoring and alerting us to dangerous medical conditions.

This will increase our ability to get timely medical care and save lives.

This is a long way from “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up,” and that’s a great thing.