Bills, Health, and Purpose

So I wanted to share some wisdom from one of my best friends. 


He was telling me about some of life’s stresses at work, home, etc., and he said even though every looks forward to retirement “one day,” the problems don’t go away. 


He mentioned some examples of people he knows that retired relatively young and with a pension.


Nevertheless, he said:

They still worry about bills, about health, and mostly about purpose!


And even though they don’t have the day-to-day grind in the office, he said:

Their own stress is as real to them as mine is to me.


I couldn’t help reflecting on his words and thinking how smart this was. 


No one has it all!


Everyone is this world has fears, worries, and problems. 


And you know what?  It’s okay.  


Life is about us confronting what seems unconfrontable and becoming better human beings because we did. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

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Shooting at The Tree of Life

Please read my new article in The Times of Israel called, “Devastation at The Tree of Life Shooting.”

No, this is certainly not the Tree of Life in the Garden of Eden–this murderous scene was certainly no Eden! On this Shabbat there is not life in that holy house of worship, but another familiar Jewish massacre from a gunman screaming, “All the Jews need to die!”

Let us be strong together and hope for the full redemption when peace and brotherhood will soon prevail. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

The Anxiety Filter

What a brilliant picture of “Anxiety” by a child in Montgomery County, Maryland. 


Notice the great big letters–and all in caps–for what ANXIETY feels like. 


Anxiety is black–it’s when we are in a dark foreboding place and we can’t find our way out–it holds us back from doing what we need and like to do. 


Anxiety feels so all-enveloping and ginormous–it dwarfs us in the “I”–and we feel so small and are paralyzed, incapable of freeing ourselves from it. 


Anxiety is a cognitive and emotional bias where we see things in black and white–everything is to the extreme–and there are no greys; we tend to talk in all or nothing and our actions may mimic our extreme feelings. 


Around the anxiety, we are bordering in blood red–we are in a dangerous place–where our feelings of fear, inadequacy, and being incapable of overcoming it can lead us to do something desperate and final. 


When we are drowning in anxiety, it is like a lens or filter that clouds our vision and thinking, so we can make bad decisions, not make any decisions, or just procrastinate in order to avoid the issue and thing we are afraid of. 


We have to fight off the octopus grip of anxiety.


We have to find our courage within and from G-d.


We have to conquer our demons so we can meet our destiny head-on. 


We have a mission to fulfill in our life, and we can’t let anything get in the way. 


Fate is waiting for us to make our important contribution, so then we can be gathered to our fathers and rest in final peace. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Why Worry?

So I had an interesting conversation with a colleague, and they tell me their philosophy about worry, as follows:

Worrying is suffering twice!


I thought this was pretty smart. 


With worry, we suffer when we worry and then we suffer again if the thing we are worrying about actually comes to fruition. 


So in essence, we are doubling up on the suffering.


Yet, worry can be constructive if we use it to spur us to positive action such as in confronting and dealing with challenging situations. 


But when we worry just for the sake of worry because we can’t control our anxiety and moreover, it actually may paralyze us with fear, then this is obviously a bad thing. 


Do I worry?


Sure do, but like my dad, I use worry to try and think out-of-the-box, to plan, to problem-solve, to figure out coping mechanisms etc. 


Worry is suffering for sure. 


However, if we can channel the worry to positive impact, then the worry can be worth the pain it inflicts on us. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Vampire Slayer

So can you believe they actually have this?


It’s a vampire killing kit that was really for sale in the 19th century. 


These kits were developed and sold by entrepreneur, Professor Ernst Blomberg.


People were afraid of the blood-sucking beasts, especially in Eastern Europe. 


And so when they traveled, they came prepared.


– Dagger with a ghoulish-looking skeleton for a handle


– Pistol along with several silver bullets


– Wooden stake to thrust into its evil heart


– Cross and Holy Water (or perhaps a Star of David for the Jewish version of the kit) to repel them


Of course, we don’t have any evil bloodsucking creatures these days, do we? 


I have a feeling that a lot of people would like to have a kit like this for self-defense to keep the 21st-century version of these bad actors away. 


You think the NRA would be interested in making something like this. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Politics On A Cow

I saw this “Antifa” (Anti-Fascist) symbol on this painting of a cow in Washington, D.C. 


As a child of Holocaust survivors, I certainly understand and can even sympathize with the view of the anti-fascist movement–certainly, we should all unequivocally appreciate, love, and want to protect freedom and human rights!


However, I think throwing around labels like fascist, perhaps where it is more about political disagreements doesn’t help to identify the really bad actors out there in the world and what they can and even would like to do to harm all of us. 


Anyway, I am pretty sure that this cow is no fascist.


I would also like to say that the red and black with this symbol here is way too close to looking like how the genocidal Nazi’s themselves portrayed the dreaded and infamous swastika in red and black.  


It would be great if we use symbols and labels carefully, and let the cows go back to being cows. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Improv, Let’s Do it

What an incredible experience today. 


We went to the Atlas Theater in Washington, D.C. and did Improv (no script). 


For a Jewish kid from the Bronx, this was not something I was used to, but I loved it. 


– Say your name and an animal with the same first letter and act it out.


– Say something you love or hate and everyone gravitates on the stage towards or from it based on whether they agree.


– Repeat a word and action from someone else and pass it on.


– Act out an action that someone else calls out after yelling “Let’s do it!” 


– As a group, answer a question from the audience, by each person adding a word to the aggregated answer. 


– Give your neighbor a pretend object and after they identify what they think it is and thank you for it, you explain why you gave it to them.


– Stand on an emotion (happy, sad, angry, scared) and act out a scene with someone else rotating through the feelings.


– Pretend you’re a hitchhiker and infest the emotion with everyone else in the car.


I was really amazed at how good so many people were with doing these exercises. 


And I felt it was so freeing to be doing it too. 


I feel like I really learned a lot about being comfortable with yourself and just letting your inhibitions go and even though it was scary and hard, I would like to do this again. 


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)