People That We Meet Each Day

Faces
This piece of art sort of reminded me of the Sesame Street song “People In Your Neighborhood.”



So, who are the people in your neighborhood?

The people that you meet each day.



We meet and interact with all types of people…funny and nice to mean and scary. 



Sometimes, you can see it on their faces–or especially in their eyes–who they are and what are their intentions. 



Other times, looks can be grossly deceiving, and we really have no clue who or what we are dealing with–psychopath or good samaritan.



Lately, as I meet or pass people, I see them on two distinct levels:



One is the physcial body they are in…their outward manifestation…the shell or outer casing that houses “them.”



Two is the soul or G-dly spirit on the inside…the real them…the part that lived before and will live on even after the outside body is long gone. 



Our bodies are just housings for our souls…some people have physical disabilities, almost like a car that has broken parts over time…but what is inside perceives the greater reality and in a sense is both facilitated through and limited by our bodies–whether whole or broken. 



Sometimes, I feel like I am just looking right through the person and am really seeing their inner essence soul. 



Looks are just outside…inside is the real people we meet each day. 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

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Touch Free, Just Use Your Head

Israel Innovation News is reporting a very simple but cool new technology for the disabled.

It enables them to “read, play games, search the web, and make calls without the need for touch.”

Sesame Reader, from the Google App Store, “tracks your face and allows you to turn [eReader] pages with the movement of your head.”

You can also dial a number or type of a keyboard by using movement of the head to control the cursor movement and by hovering over a button to “click it.”

This helps people to function in a digital world, when otherwise they couldn’t.

Hence, the name Sesame from Ali Baba’s magic phrase “Open Sesame.”

Now people can read, write, and interact with others online–even when they don’t have use of their limbs because of neurological, muscular, and other structural defect, or if they simply want hands-free use.

Touchscreens, keyboards, and keypads are now accessible to anyone with the simple turn of the head–up, down, left, and right is all all it takes to navigate, touchless. 😉