Longevity…85 Is The New 65

Youth.jpeg

So I was speaking to one of our very nice elderly neighbors.


Last week he lost his dear wife of 60 years!


I had visited him during Shiva (the Jewish period of mourning) to wish him our best and let him know we are there if there is anything he needs. 


He told me how the night before she passed, they had gone out to eat and to the theatre (she loved the theatre)…and everything was fine!


And then the next day, he went to work–he still teaches medicine at the local hospital 2 days a month.


At midday, he called his wife and asked how she was and if she needed anything from the store (to eat etc.)


She told him she was fine and she didn’t need anything. 


But by the time he got home just one hour later…she had fallen, hit her head, and died. 


He tried to do CPR by it was no use, she was gone. 


Both he and his wife were 84-years old. 


He mentioned that would tease her that he was 3 months older than her, and so she had to listen to him!


I felt so bad for him…it was obvious how much he loved her and missed her already. 


When he told me how old she was, I tried to say reassuringly:

“That’s a good old age…at least she lived a full life!”


But then he answered:

“84–that’s nothing! 85 is the new 65!!!”  

And went on to tell me how many of their friends are already in the 90’s. 


It’s funny how no matter what age you are…there is always a will to live!


He said how she had passed quickly and so maybe he could consider that a blessing. 


And we talked about how it truly is especially when some other people really suffer prolonged periods with terrible debilitating and painful illnesses. 


It was also strange that around the same time, I ran into yet another elderly neighbor, and he had tears in his eyes…and I asked how he is. 


He told me how he just learned 3 weeks ago that his wife has lung cancer. 


Seeing his expression how bad things were, I inquired what stage it was at. 


He said, “stage 3 cancer,” and I told him as well how sorry I was for his pain. 


All this made me realize again, how very tenuous life is…and we all hang by a thread that G-d decides at any moment when to shear and when to cut–we need to live every moment to the fullest and as if it’s our last. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

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Globs of Fat

 

fat-jpeg-2

So I went to get my flu shot today in the office. 


Yes, it’s that time of year to start getting ready for Winter and all the germs that come with it. 


Anyway, while I was at the health center, they had this model of what body fat looks like. 


It was sort of just laying right on the table in the waiting room–yeah a big ick! 


It said:

“Globs of Fat

This glob represents the look and feel of 5 pounds of body fat.”


And this thing was enormous, bigger than someones hand, maybe even two hands. 


There was some text about another 1 pound piece of body fat, but I didn’t see that lying around anywhere (and frankly the 5 pound glob was enough to get the point without comparison). 


This fat demonstration would make practically anyone want to chuck the carbohydrates and forever.


Pizza, pasta, bread, rice, potatoes, cereal, crackers, cookies, cakes–be gone!


Having recently done this myself, I can really appreciate how important this is and also how hard it can be. 


The food industry has us addicted to this crap and really it should be illegal. 


The high carb diet in America is truly of epidemic proportions and is potentially catastrophic to our health and longevity.


The only thing that glob of fat is good for is tossing it out the window and into the garbage dump. 


A high carb diet that makes people fat is death and we want to live! 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Seaweed Success Diet

Seaweed

Ok, I am going to let you in on a little secret. 


Part of the success of my diet. 


This is us checking out at register. 


The cashier is tallying up dozens of Wasabi Roasted Seaweeds.


The stuff is a great healthy snack. 


I had read for years now how the healthy Japanese diet includes plenty of seaweed and fish. 


And I have been imitating their knowledgable ways. 


And it is working, thank G-d.


Of course, the wasabi flavor gives it a little kick too. 


Do yourselves a favor and get rid of all the disgusting carbohydrates in your life. 


They are poison from an industry that wants you addicted to their garbage foods. 


Get back to basics like fish, meat, vegetables, and that includes plenty of seaweed. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Secret To Long Life

Eat Walk Laugh Love.jpeg

I just love this Tibetan proverb on the secret to long life

“Eat Half

Walk Double

Laugh Triple

and 

Love Without Measure,”

The rest is icing on the Tibetan cake. 

(Source Photo: Rebecca Blumenthal via Facebook)

How Many Issues Do You Have?

More Issues Than Vogue
I saw someone with this funny iPhone case in Starbucks.



It says, “More Issues Than Vogue.”



So I was curious how many issues of Vogue have there been…



And I learned that they have published this fashion, beauty, and culture magazine since 1892–more than 120 years!



And in the Vogue archive, they claim to have “more than 400,000 pages in full color.”



I suppose even some of the biggest nuts out there rarely have more “issues” (and pages)…although maybe many would certainly come close. 



But Vogue wins! 😉

I Watch the Years Go By

Sunshine Man
So two quick stories on getting a little older…



First story:



After my workout today, a guy follows me into the elevator.  



He opens conversation and asks me, “Did you have a good workout?”



I said, “Sure did! What did you do today [for exercise]?”



He motions his arms up and down like pushing some machines and doing some curls, “A little of this and that [long pause]…You know I’m 80!”



I said, “Wow that’s awesome that you still work out–can I ask, how do you do it?”



He replies, “The key is to always keep going, and not to give up.”



I say, “Yes, but also I think it has a lot to do with the One Above.”



He nods in agreement, although still looking determined to keep himself pumping away in the gym. 



As the elevator doors open I say, “Well, I sure hope you can keep going like this for another 80 years.”



He gives me a warm smile, and says, “I hope so too.”



Second story:



One of my colleagues at work is retiring after an amazing 51 years of service to the government. 



Now this guy having been around awhile has a really nice engraving of the agencies seal hung on the wall in his office, and months ago, I had commented to him how beautiful and special it was and that “they don’t make them like they used to.”



He said, “Well you know what? When I retire, I’m going to pass it on to for safekeeping.” I thought that is nice, but also probably just talk as they say. 



Well recently, he has announced his “big day” and so he stops by my office, and in his hands he is holding the beautiful seal engraving–he puts out his arms, handing it to me. 



I was like, “OMG, I didn’t really expect this. This is great.  Are you sure you want me to have it.”



You says, “Absolutely!” referring back to his promise a number of months ago.  Then he pauses, obviously thinking for a moment, and says to me, “But you have to put in 51 years of government service also! [big smile]”



I said, “That’s a noble idea, but honestly, I think I started a little late for that. How about we go for 30 or so with G-d’s help?”



Anyway, thinking about these two events, I am not quite sure how these amazing people do it…years of doing, giving, and with a great attitude–and always a desire for another round to go. 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Strategy, Blue and Red and Successful All Over

Blue_ocean
Recently, I was reading about something called “Blue Ocean Strategy.”
The notion is that in pursuing differentiation, an organization’s aim is “not to out-perform the competition in the exiting industry [and to fight it out turning the oceans blood red), but [rather] to create a new market space or a blue ocean, thereby making the competition irrelevant.”
While I like the ocean’s metaphor and agree with the need for organizations to innovate and create new products and services (“blue oceans”), I think that competition (“red oceans”) is not something that is inescapable, in any way.
In profitable industries or market spaces, competition will enter until supply and demand equilibrium are met, so that consumers are getting more or less, the optimal supply at the requisite demand. The result is that organizations will and must constantly fight for survival in a dynamic marketplace.
Moreover, as we know, any organization that rests on its past successes, is doomed to the trash heaps of history as John Champers, the CEO of Cisco stated: It’s “easy to say we’re the best…we don’t need to change, but that’s exactly how you disappear.”
In essence, while we may wish to avoid a duke-it-out, red ocean strategy, every successful innovative, differentiation-driven, blue ocean strategy will result in a subsequent red ocean strategy as competitors smell blood and hone in for the kill and their piece of flesh and cut of market share, revenue, and profit hide.
To me, it is naïve to think that blue ocean and red ocean strategies are distinct, because every blue ocean eventually turns blood red with competition, unless you are dealing with a monopoly or unfair competitive environment that favors one organization over any others.
The key to success and organizational longevity is for innovations to never cease.  When innovation dries up, it is the moment when the organization begins their drowning decent into the ocean’s abyss.
So as with the lifecycle of all organizations, blue ocean strategies will eventually result in red oceans strategies.  Once this occurs, either the organization will leverage their next blue ocean strategy or bleed red until their body drains itself out and dies off—leaving the superior organization’s blue ocean strategy to carry the day.
Together, blue oceans and red oceans—drive the next great innovation and healthy competition in our dynamic, flourishing market.
(Source Photo: here with attribution to freezingmariner)