The Best Jobs 2020 and Beyond

 

So I saw a smart video about which are the best jobs.


They are not the ones that just pay the most!


Here are the three criteria to look for in your next dream job (aside from the money):


1) Autonomy – Work that is self-directed provides satisfaction that jobs that are closely or micro-managed do not. 


2) Mastery – Jobs that allow you get better at them over time  (technical proficiency) provide a sense of mastery and self-respect. 


3) Purpose – When you have a deep sense of purpose and meaning from your work there is simply no greater motivator and satisfier than this. 


I’d also add that the best places to work are the ones with:

  • The best bosses and the nicest people
  •  
  • A solid balance for work and life


Overall, if we can reconnect the profit motive with the purpose motive then we have truly have the best jobs out there. 😉


(Credit Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Can I Help You?

Act Nice
This was a beautiful story that I heard from a very senior colleague recently.



Years ago, when she started working, for whatever reason, it took many weeks for payroll to catch up and for your first check to arrive. 



In her case, she was notified that it would be something like 6 weeks before she would receive an actual paycheck.



Not a lot of good that does, when the mortgage comes due, the utility bill arrives in the mail, or you need to go shopping for groceries or medicine. 



What’s interesting and inspiring here though is what this lady’s boss did at that time. 



She recalled that when he heard that she would not be getting paid for so many weeks, he came to her and asked her if she needed any money in the meantime to hold her over–how could he help? 



He was willing to take his money and give it to her to help her through until her paycheck would arrive. 



WOW!!!



That is extremely powerful.



How many of you know a boss that would do that for you now or ever?



You see he was not only willing to step in and make some calls (which may or may not have helped anyway), but he was actually willing to pony up money from his own self/family (and which I understand he did not have a lot of either) and give it to her. 



This is caring. This is giving. This is selflessness. 



I am awed of people of this personal and moral character. 



These are people to emulate. 



There is a difference between a work environment that is purely work and get the job done, and those few and very special places still out there that have family values (and which at least try to think of you and treat you as part of some sort of an “extended family”). 



No work is not family…but decent people in any situation–in the office or on the Metro–can make a difference in someone else’s life. 



To me this is a story worth retelling and reliving for others to benefit. 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

You Can Be Nice and Powerful

You Can Be Nice and Powerful

According to the Wall Street Journal, workers “value kindness in their boss” and compassion–this is natural, as we are all human with tests, frailties, and yes, everyone even makes some mistakes (and hopefully they learn from it).

So while there may seem to be a contradiction between being nice and being an effective leader, there really is not.

For example, we can have empathy for people, while still holding them accountable to do a good job through programs like flexible schedules, telework, and other workplace accommodations.

Power in the organization can be wielded by a boss in so many ways, and they don’t even have to eat their spinach to do it.

From what assignments you get, whether you have to work odd hours, to whether you get a good evaluation or even that promotion, for that matter.

Many may be too quick to put on the punching gloves, however.

Sometimes, the boss will laud publicly over some employees, while degrading or shunning others…that sends a message doesn’t it.

Worse is boss that yells, tells someone their ideas are stupid, or glares at someone like they are a moron…that takes someone straight to employment hell.

The email chain is the classic message!

So while power can be wielded, it can also be shielded by appreciating each person for what they can do and their contribution, if sincere and merited.

While employees value a nice boss, this doesn’t mean that we don’t want to be challenged, we do–challenge adds some meaning to our jobs and our day–that’s why 75% would rather work for a high-achieving, but demanding boss than a nice, but ineffective one.

But combine nice and high-achieving into a boss, and I think we will all want to work for such a leader and follow them wherever they go! 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)