Hammer and Nail

Often, we have a one size fits all orientation to life. 

“To a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”


We try to solve fresh daily problems, yet everything we are going through is seen through our preset filters and mindsets. 


In many cases, we are simply and undeniably biased, mistakenly believing that what worked in the past or for particular challenges will always work in the future and for all our problems. 


We stereotype people and races and see them as either “the good guys” or “the bad guys”–but there’s no grey in there to further differentiate.  


Also, we work in a comfortable zone of blind routine thinking that we wish it’s all as simple as wash, rinse, and repeat.


But while some die-hard habits and lessons learned in life are very valuable and should be mentally recorded and referenced, seeing life through a single, or even a few handy-dandy, filters can prove disastrous when things or times change. 


For example, one big criticism of our dealing in Washington is that:

“Politicians, like generals, have a tendency to fight the last war.”


Instead, if we evaluate the nuances of each person and particular situation, we can work to get a more detailed evaluation, and potentially be able to fine-tune approaches for what needs to be done, and how, with each and every one, accordingly. 


Chucking a batman belt approach to just using whatever tools are immediately available, can facilitate a broader and more creative approach to problem-solving. 


Sure, to a certain degree, we are creatures of habit–and we intuitively rely on what’s worked in the past, and reject and shun what hasn’t–but past experiences do not necessarily foretell future successes. 


If we don’t stay agile and resilient, we can easily get blown away by the situation or the competition. 


There is always a new challenge to test us and someone coming up who may be better, faster, or stronger that wants to try and take us on or down. 


A shotgun approach, in lieu of a more precise surgical strike, can result in a lot of collateral damage and maybe even missing the mark altogether. 


Think, think, think. 


Focus on what needs to get done–apply lessons learned as applicable, but also look for new sources and methods to build a bigger and more versatile tool chest.


In the walking dead, a hammer to the head works fairly well on all Zombies, but sometimes there are too many zombies in the hoard or even more dangerous living people and situations to attend to. 😉


(Source Photo: here with attribution to stevepb)

Funnier In Yiddish

Yiddish
Yiddish is a language with words derived primarily from German, Hebrew, and Aramaic.



When someone wants to know if you speak Yiddish, sometimes, they just say, “Do you speak Jewish?” 



Many of the Yiddish words are popular and have become commonplace in our communications now-a-day. 



One of my friends used to say, “Jokes are always funnier in Yiddish.”



And sure enough, there is something about Yiddish words, pronunciations, and nuances that make getting a point across very potent and at the same time, quite humorous. 



Take the words on this eduational Yiddish poster–it’s like the Yiddish words just sound like and makes perfect sense for what it is (see how many you recognize):



– Bagel – Bagel 



– Chazar – Pig



– Chootspah (chutzpah) – Gall 



– Gonif – Thief



– Imglick – Luck



– Klutz – Clumsy



– Kvitch (kvetch)- Complainer



– Macher – Big shot



– Mishugina (mashugana) – Crazy



– Noodnik – Annoying



– Pipik – Belly Button



– Shlep – Lug 



– Shmootz – Dirt



– Shnops (schnapps) – Liquor



– Shvigger – Mother-in-law



– Trafe – Unkosher



– Tsooris – Problems



– Yenta – Talker



– Zoftig – Fat



There is one more word not on the list here that is probably recongizable and that is a “shmuck,” which refers to a contemptable person, but literally refers to a man’s private parts–ah, maybe that’s why it’s not on the picture poster. 😉



(Source photo: Andy Blumenthal)