Can’t Live With ‘Em & Without ‘Em

Marriage.JPeG

Remember the funny comedy show, Married with Children.


The theme song is playing in my head, “Love and marriage, love and marriage, go together like a horse and carriage.”


Love and marriage–it’s something we all aspire to. 


Like in Noah’s ark, we all want to couple off and be with that special person that complements us, can finish our sentences, helps us grow and develop and reach our potential, and of course raise a family!


This last couple of days for me the overarching theme has been the importance of a good marriage.


First I saw this funny sign that said, “Get married once, and do it right.”


Well, okay…


Then the wonderful Rabbi Kaplan of Chabad, here in Downtown Fort Lauderdale, spoke to us about the great joy and “naches” (pride and gratification) of marriage and family.


And once again, when my wife asked this classy lady she met in Florida, how she stayed so thin, the lady responded, “It’s the divorce diet.”


Ah, eat your heart out baby…that’s not the best way to lose weight now, is it? 


Anyway, it’s a true blessing to find that great match, and when there is an overall healthy relationship built on respect, trust, good communication, and of course being best friends. 


I wish I had that (just kidding…).  :-))


Perhaps a nice New Years wish is for everyone to find their soulmate and live happily ever after. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Can You Love A Robot

Lollypop
Pew Research reports that by 2025, “Robotic sex partners will be commonplace.”



While I certainly understand loving (new helpful) technology, actually making love to a machine is taking things a little too far.



Even with great advances in artificial intelligence (AI), a robot can be nothing more than an artificial partner…a humanoid is not a human!



Despite portrayals in the movie Her (2013) of a nerdy writer who falls in love with his life-like operating system, the reality of human and machine love is more a desperate call for companionship and understanding than a real connection of equals–physically, intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually. 



While a computer may be programmed to say the things you want to hear, to laugh at your jokes, and even to succumb to your advances, love cannot be programmed or even artificially learned. 



The complex dynamics between two real people locked-in the emotional roller coaster of life with its ups and downs, pulling together and pushing apart, of shared experiences, challenges, and conflicts, can only be met head on with a best friend, soulmate, diametric opposite, and at the same time congruent equal. 



Only another human being can love you and be your love.



A machine, however beautiful designed, charming, and learning of you, can be just a poor surrogate for the sad person screaming out for connection in a large lonely world. 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

What True Love Means

A Walk To Remember–what an absolutely amazing movie.

This girl with a beautiful soul, Jamie, turns around the life of this lost boy, Landon.

She warns him not to fall in love with her, but he does.

She reveals that she has Leukemia and is no longer responding to medicine.

Landon is head over heels for her and marries her despite the prognosis.

They enjoy one summer of love before she passes.

But she has changed his life forever.

I cried like a baby at this one.

It was a movie of faith, love, and turnaround–it made me believe again. 😉

“Love is always patient and kind. It is never jealous. Love is never boastful or conceited. It is never rude of selfish. It does not offense and is not resentful. Love takes no pleasure in other people’s sins, but delights in the truth. It is always ready to excuse, to trust, to hope, and to endure whatever comes.” – Nicholas Sparks

>10 Obstacles to Enterprise Architecture

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Here is an interesting list of 10 obstacles to the enterprise architecture from a colleague and friend, Andy Wasser, Associate Dean, Carnegie Mellon University School of Information Systems Management:

  1. Lack of Senior Management [Commitment] Support
  2. Inability to obtain necessary resources (funds, personnel, time)
  3. Business partner alienation
  4. Internal IT conflicts and turf issues (no centralized authority)
  5. Lack of credibility of the EA team
  6. Inexperience with enterprise architecture planning or inexperience with the organization
  7. Entrenched IT team [operational focus versus strategic]
  8. Focus on EAP methodologies and tools [rather than on outputs and outcomes]
  9. Uncertain payback and ROI
  10. Disharmony between sharing data vs. protecting data

This is a good list for the chief enterprise architect to work with and develop strategies for addressing these. If I may, here are some thoughts on overcoming them:

1-4,7,9: Obtain Senior management commitment/support, resources, and business/IT partnership by articulating a powerful vision for the EA; identify the benefits (and mandates); preparing an EA program assessment, including lessons learned and what you need to do to make things “right”; developing an EA program plan with milestones that shows you have a clear way ahead. Providing program metrics of how you intend to evaluate and demonstrate progress and value for the business/IT.

5,6,8: Build credibility for EA planning, governance, and organizational awareness by hiring the best and the brightest and train, train, train; getting out of the ivory tower and working hand-in-hand in concert with business partners; building information products and governance services that are useful and usable to the organization (no shelfware!); using a three-tier metamodel (profiles, models, and inventories) to provide information in multiple levels of details that makes it valuable and actionable from everyone from the analyst to the chief executive officer; looking for opportunities (those that value EA and want to participate) and build incrementally (“one success at a time”).

10: Harmonize information sharing and security by developing an information governance board (that includes the chief information security officer) to vet information sharing and security issues; establishing data stewards to manage day-to-day issues including metadata development, information exchange package descriptions, discovery, accessibility, and security; creating a culture that values and promotes information sharing, but also protects information from inappropriate access and modification.

>The "Right" Way to Introduce New Technology and Enterprise Architecture

> I came across some interesting lessons learned on rolling out new technology (from the perspective of franchisers/franchisees) that apply nicely to user-centric enterprise architects (adapted from The Wall Street Journal, 26 November 2007):

1) Partner with the user–“if you can get a franchisee really excited about the new technology, it’s a lot simpler to get it rolled out…if I can convince you, and you can see the difference, you will be my best spokesman.”

2) Testing it first–“finding a guinea pig…we have a lot of people telling us they have great concepts. We want to see that it works with our customer base, our menu, our procedures first.”

3) Show the cost-benefit–“an enhancement may look promising, but if its payback is years away, the investment may not compute.” Why fix it, if it ain’t broke.

4) Keep it simple–“most franchisees are focused on their business, not technology…so they’re not looking for something to complicate their lives.” Also, focus the solution on the operators in the field and not on the headquarters staff, who may not be completely in tune with the realities on the front lines with the customers.