Who’s The Boss (The Good and Bad) ?

Who's The Boss (The Good and Bad) ?

Harvard Business Review had a helpful list of 8 leadership types:

1. Strategists – (Chess game) – provide vision, strategy, enterprise architecture.
2. Change agents – (Turnaround expert) – reengineering the organization.
3. Transactors – (Deal-maker) – make deals and negotiate positive outcomes.
4. Builders – (Entrepreneur) – create something new.
5. Innovators – (Idea generator) – solve difficult problems.
6. Processors – (Efficiency expert) – run organization like a well-oiled machine.
7. Coaches – (Develop People) – get the best out of people for a high-performance culture.
8. Communicators – (Influencer) – explain clearly what (not how) needs to be done to succeed.

I would say these are the positive archetypes of leadership, but what about the negative leadership models?

Here’s a shot at the 8 types of awful leaders (and wish they throw in towel and go away):

1. Narcissists – (Self-centered) – focused on stroking their own egos and pushing their own agendas, rather than the success of mission and people.
2. Power mongers – (Domineering) – Looking to grow their piece of the corporate pie, not the pie itself.
3. Competitors – (Win-Lose) – deals with colleagues as enemies to defeat, rather than as teammates to collaborate with.
4. Micromanagers – (My way or the highway) – doesn’t delegate or people the leeway to do their jobs, rather tells them how to do it the right and only way.
5. Insecure babies – (Lacking in self-confidence) – marginalizes or gets rid of anyone who is a challenge to their “leadership,” rather than valuing and capitalizing on diversity.
6. Sadists – (Bullying) – use their leadership pulpits to make others squirm under their oppressive thumbs and they enjoy it, rather than using their position to help people.
7. Thieves (Credit grabbers) – steal other people’s ideas and recognition for their own self-promotion, rather than elevate others for their contributions.
8. Biased baddies – (Whatever I want) – manage arbitrarily by subjective management whim and playing personal favorites, rather than through objective facts and maintaining equity.

How many of you have dealt with the good as well as the bad and ugly? 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Words Have Meaning

Recently, I heard a very smart mentor tell a crowd that “words have meaning.”

The context was that even in relation to giving criticism, it is important to be constructive, and not destructive to those receiving it.

Some are not good at giving criticism and others can be downright sadistic–humiliating, embarrassing, marginalizing, verbally abusing, and even throwing things.

Words can really hurt people, and the kids song about “stick and stones may break my bones, but words will never harm me”–is just not true for children or adults.

From a work perspective, I relate this to what I learned earlier in my life about being not only balanced with people and their performance, but also seeing the whole human being–listening to them and being empathetic.

In performance terms, it’s as important to say what people are doing well, as well as to point out areas where their is room for improvement–and yes, it’s hard to admit it, but no one of us is perfect, and at the same time, no one really likes to be criticized.

So it takes a special talent, but one that can be learned–if you have an open mind–to have a heart-to-heart with others, and show that you are not just criticizing to be an S.O.B., but that you genuinely accept the person for who they are, and want to help them learn and grow–and do even better in the future.

We all have strengths and weakness, and with kindness, we can help others to rise above their limitations and break new barriers in their lives.

I came across a different example of where words have meaning in terms of people looking for opportunity.

I heard a story about this person who when asked why they should get a job, responded because they are a “good person.”

Word do have meaning and we don’t give opportunities to people because they like the person they are, but rather because they have “earned it” professionally–life is competitive and opportunities are not just handed out.

One more example of how words have meaning, happened when I heard one lady ask another what her son was doing for the summer (given all the unemployment). The other lady replied, “oh, he’s busy–sleeping and eating.”

Ouch. Yes, times are tough out there, but to hear the mother say it–in that way–about her own child, just sounded perhaps a little harsh and judgmental, but who really knows their particular circumstance.

Words have meaning–they can bring lovers together, hurt those you love the most, damage reputations, destroy lives, and tear nations apart or bring unity to them and determination to their cause.

Watching what we say and how we say it–is important for us in growing as decent and thoughtful human beings and in becoming good leaders–in both, we have to have heart and treat others well in both word and deed.

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)