If This Then That (IFTTT), A Futurists Blessing

IFTTT.PNG

If This Then That (IFTTT) is a simple, but absolutely fundamental programming principle.


It is also the basis for futurist-thinking such as war-gaming and strategic planning.  For example, if North Korea put’s a nuke on the launch pad with the targeting at the U.S., then we will do kaboom!


IFTTT is also an app and is used in algorithms such as with Twitter, so when Trump or other famous and powerful people say something on the global social media stage, Wall Street’s high-speed, high-frequency trading desks are at the front of the line to respond to market-moving news.


So powerful is IFTTT, you could almost predict the election results from it (the outrageously biased media may want to open their tarnished rose-colored glasses and try it).  For example, if you take for granted, forget or neglect working class America, then the great “blue wall” tumbles. 


IFTTT also works in politics of all sorts. If you abandon friends and allies and embrace terrorist enemies, then the world order is turned on it’s head and the Middle East and beyond burns and rages in turmoil. Similarly, if you are biased between people, races, and political parties, then you polarize the country and create divisiveness and hate and obstruct even the possibility of virtually any progress. 


So you really don’t have to have a crystal ball to see the writing on the wall for the results of profoundly good moves and the display of stupidity galore. 


One final IFTTT before the major transition of power this week: if you talk big, but don’t really deliver results (or you deliver lots of bad stuff), then you get seen for being all poetry and no prose, and your legacy goes bye bye. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Versioning Gone Wild

Version Out Of Control

So software versioning is supposed to be a way to manage change control. 


However, many vendors have gone out of control with versioning. 


1) Incompatibility–It isn’t backward compatible, so if you try to work with an older version file/data, you may be sh*t of out of luck getting it to work. 


2) Alphabet-Numerical Soup–We have so many versions of the same/similar thing, we can make your head spin with buyer envy. 


3) Functionally Indistinct–Version changes are so minute or insignificant that there is virtually no difference to the end-user, but you’ll love it anyway. 


4) Long And Meaningless–Some versions just seem to go on and on into the weeds…like version 2.10.3.97–ah, let’s compare that to the new version of the week of 2.10.3.98, and don’t forget the 2.10.4 will be a completely different platform, so you better remember to order the right one. 


5) Upgrade Pathless–You want to be on the current version, well your version is so legacy and ancient, there’s no (easy) upgrade path–you have to install 26 patches, hot fixes, and 9 new versions and then you’ll be on the right one!


6) Maintaining Multiple Versions–You’ll need to maintain multiple versions of the same product, because your data on the older version can’t be migrated to the new one. Can anyone say multiple maintenance fees?


7) Out Of Support–Your older version that you spent a lot of money on is no longer current  and is now out of support–so scr*w you unless you pay us again for the next money maker version. 


If you want to kill your brand and possibly your customers’ sanity, keep on going mindless version crazy. 😉


(Source Graphic: Andy Blumenthal)

>Staying Open to Open Source

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I don’t know about you, but I have always been a pretty big believer that you get what you pay for.

That is until everything Internet came along and upended the payment model with so many freebies including news and information, email and productivity tools, social networking, videos, games, and so much more.

So when it comes to something like open source (“free”) software, is this something to really take seriously for enterprise use?

According to a cover story in ComputerWorld, 10 May 2010, called “Hidden Snags In Open Source” 61% say “open source has become more acceptable in enterprises over the past few years.” And 80% cited cost-savings as the driving factor or “No. 1 benefit of open-source software.”

However, many companies do not want to take the risk of relying on community support and so “opt to purchase a license for the software rather than using the free-of-charge community version…to get access to the vendor’s support team or to extra features and extensions to the core software, such as management tools.”

To some degree then, the license costs negates open source from being a complete freebie to the enterprise (even if it is cheaper than buying commercial software).

The other major benefit called out from open source is its flexibility—you’ve got the source code and can modify as you like—you can “take a standard install and rip out the guts and do all kinds of weird stuff and make it fit the environment.”

The article notes a word of caution on using open source from Gartner analyst Mark Driver: “The key to minimizing the potential downside and minimizing the upside is governance. Without that you’re shooting in the dark.”

I think that really hits the target on this issue, because to take open source code and make that work in a organization, you have got to have mature processes (such as governance and system development life cycle, SDLC) in place for working with that code, modifying it, and ensuring that it meets the enterprise requirements, integrates well, tests out, complies with security, privacy and other policies, and can be adequately supported over its useful life.

If you can’t do all that, then the open source software savings ultimately won’t pan out and you really will have gotten what you paid for.

In short, open source is fine, but make sure you’ve got good governance and strong SDLC processes; otherwise you may find that the cowboys have taken over the Wild West.