Hope You Had A Good “Veek”

So I was asked do you spell week with a “W” or a “V.”


I guess sometimes it does sound like we say veek.


Someone else told me that they are divorced and that person is still a “dark force” in their life.


They said they have to pay child support but can’t afford it. 

It’s not like I still earn $55,000 like I used to.


But if they don’t pay…

Well my ex will just refuse to let me see my son!


People have tough lives. 


So when you think about your week, hopefully in context, you can resolutely say that you had a good veek. 


Shabbat Shalom! 😉


(Credit Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Going From Hearing To Listening

Silent.jpeg

I thought this was pretty good. 


How do we go from hearing to listening?


We have to be silent (and contemplative)!


– Check out the letters in the word silent.


– They are exactly the same as the letters in the word listen.


Keep the mouth shut and really listen to the what the other person has to say, and you might actually learn something. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Anyway You Spell It

Anyway You Spell It

Not to be mean or anything, but this was an eye-catching advertisement for this vendor’s services.

But whether or not you can spell what you are doing, if you are good at your job–what’s the difference.

D.C. is a funny town: some people can spell and some can Repari watches. 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Autocomplete: Do Zombies (What)?

The autocomplete feature in search engines can tell us a lot about what people are thinking and asking about.

According to the New York Times (21 November 2012) “sites like Google and Bing are showing the precise questions that are most frequently asked.”

Autocomplete suggests the rest of your search term based on the most popular things that others have asked for, so it speeds up your search selection by anticipating what you are looking for and by reducing spelling errors in your search terms.


Another advantage to seeing popular searches is to understand what the larger population is thinking about and looking for–this gives us insight into culture, norms, values, and issues of the time.

I did a simple google search of “do zombies” and as you can see the most popular searches are about whether zombies: poop, exist, sleep, “really exist,” and have brains. 

Even more disappointing than people asking whether zombies really exist is that the #1 search on zombies is about whether they poop–what does that say about our lagging educational system?

I would at least have imagined that the preppers–those infatuated with the end of the world and with preparation for survival–would at least be searching for terms like:

Do zombies…

pose a real threat to human survival?

have (certain) vulnerabilities?

ever die?

have feelings?

have children?

beat vampires (or vice versa)?

I suppose autocomplete is good at crowdsourcing search terms of what others are thinking about, but it is only as good as those doing the ultimate searching–our collection intelligence at work. 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)