Monument To The Homeless

I really had to take a second look at this. 


From a distance, it looked like another homeless person sleeping on the bench in Washington., D.C. 


But as I got closer, I realized this was a statue of a homeless person.


And the only thing real about it was the empty cup of Dunkin’ Donuts coffee next to it. 


Honestly, I am not sure what the point of this statue is. 


There are enough REAL homeless people to remind us of their serious plight and the critical need to help them. 


The money that went into creating this monument would’ve been far better spent on helping these real people in need. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Most Amazing Sculpture

This is the most amazing sculpture that I have ever seen.


Let me explain why?


It looks like a bust of a woman with a fine fabric lace veil over hear head and face.


But believe it or not, the veil is part of the sculpture.


And her eyes are just shadows of it. 


In other words, there is no veil or eyes. 


The museum tour guide pulled out a flashlight and pointed it and her eyes and they were gone. 


How any artist can have such a divine gift to make something like this is really beyond me.


All I can do is stare in complete marvel at this sculpture of a veil covering this woman’s face. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

One G-d, Many Stories

So we went to the mall and there was a new Indian gift store.


We went in to take a look, and they had all sorts of things, but one section had a lot of colorful statues. 


We didn’t even really know what we were looking at when one of the young lady salespeople came over to explain. 


And she’s pointing to different statues and saying that this is the “G-d of love,” this is the “G-d of prosperity,” this is the “G-d for removing obstacles,” etc. 


I said to her questioningly (non-judgmental), “So we are Jews, and we believe in monotheism. How do you understand this concept of different ‘G-ds’?”


She said, “Well, I learned about these growing up in India, but the way I’ve come to terms with this is that these “G-ds” are really different ‘faces’ of one G-d” and then she started to tell us the “stories” of them. 


So in her explanation, when they are confronting challenges in life, they pray to the “face of G-d” that focuses on removing those obstacles, and when they are seeking prosperity then they pray to that “face of G-d” so on and so forth. 


It was interesting to me how this young lady came to find a monotheistic interpretation and path for herself and perhaps others who have similar beliefs.  


I wondered to myself whether this understanding can be in a way be similar to the Jewish concept of G-d having different attributes like midat Rachamin, din, etc. 


Of course, I know that G-d loves all of us, and I respect everyone’s personal beliefs.


For me and my traditional Jewish belief system, I wholeheartedly affirm as my namesake Abraham:

Sh’ma Yis’rael, Hashem Elo’kenu, Hashem Echad.
Hear O’ Israel, the L-rd our G-d, the L-rd is one.  

 😉


(Source Photo: here with attribution to Moshe Shalom)

Homeless and Hungry

street-sense-jpeg

I took this photo in Washington, DC.


Two statues of back-to-back homeless people in the grit on the sidewalk.


They sit as everyone rushes on past them–many stone faced as well as too many stone hearted.


In this case, someone put the newspaper Street Sense on the lap of the statue. 


As many in DC, the homeless are trying to get back on their feet in this case by writing articles for and selling this newspaper about homelessness, poverty, and social issues. 


Impressive that they sell about 16,000 of the biweekly 16-page paper and that the homeless vendors make about $45 per day doing this. 


Like this picture of the homeless on the street, bracing back against each other and sort of huddled up among the masses of the fortunate around them, I imagine that they must really feel like these statues–odd, uncomfortable, lost, scared, and painted over by society that marks them as dirty, dangerous, and unwanted.


But these homeless and hungry are G-d’s children, no less than any of us!


I applaud Street Sense and other advocates and activists that see, hear, and feel beyond themselves and help the needy and downtrodden. 


Helping these people in desperate need is truly G-d’s work, and like recently sainted, Mother Teresa, is an act of unbelievable kindness and mercy that we can all learn from and should emulate. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

The King And Queen

King And Queen

Took this photo of these two Chinese porcelain statues.


They remind me of royalty–a king and queen. 


They stand so tall, proud, and elegant. 


Together on the mantel, they make a wonderful centerpiece to the room. 


I like the contrast colors–him in tan and she is white with the accent colors on their robes. 


His grasp on the long beaded necklace and her open fan give them a air of motion and life.


Yet, the faces are calm and balanced. 


These are awesome pieces of art work. 


Don’t know what they are worth, but to me they have value of beauty. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Color Me Different

Soldiers
I saw this restaurant and followed the color in to take this photo.



They had these multi-colored figurines lined up proudly on the ledge overlooking the tables and patrons. 



Each was different, but also the same. 



They had no faces, and were cut this way and that into segments of color (head, torso, butts, arms, legs, feet)…uniformity, but diversity. 

They are low-tech, but reminded me of robots or toy soldiers, but without the guns–just standing in colorful attention ushering people in to sit and eat and enjoy. 😉



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)