Remembering the 52 And Hoping For A Real Peace

Remembering the 52 And Hoping For A Real Peace

This week was the 34-year anniversary since the Iran Hostage Crisis (which started on November 4, 1979)

52 Americans were held hostage for a long 444 days.

Now, Iran is negotiating for a relaxation of sanctions imposed due to their hostile nuclear WMD program.

However, there are questions about whether Iran will really give up the nukes  that they have pursued for decades or whether this is another stalling tactic.

The Wall Street Journal is reporting concern by Western Allies including Israel, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Bahrain, and that “Republican and Democratic supporters of Israel said the agreement in the works was far too easy on Iran.”

On the positive side, potentially, this is only the “first stage” in the Iran nuclear disarmament process–let’s hope.

We need to ensure a substantive nuclear non-proliferation deal that safeguards America’s and allies’ security and interests in the region.

We can all rest easier when the Iranian nuclear capability is fully dismantled, until then this is not a slam dunk for peace.

(Source Photos: EVResourceSite and Pere Ubu; Mashup by Andy Blumenthal)

From Happy To Glad

From Happy To Glad

So I heard a new saying: “From Happy To Glad.”

I asked some folks “What is that was all about?”

They explained that it applies to when you give someone something to review and they make really minor, nit-picky edits.

For example, they said, when someone “just has to say something” or “they can’t let it go.”

This was interesting to me, because I find it really helpful to solicit feedback and vet things with a smart, diverse group–and when you do, invariably you get a better product.

For example, with a document, the best feedback is substantive feedback about content, followed by solid edits to things like style, formatting, and of course spelling and grammar gaffes.

The goal is to have a clear, concise, and consistent communication that is either informative or action-oriented, and with a good executive summary and enough supporting detail to answer key questions.

Of course, this is very different than “Happy to glad” feedback–where you’re getting someone who possibly is wordsmithing something to death, can’t make up their own mind, wants to show how smart they are, or are just trying to drive you nuts.

With happy to glad, sure it’ll satisfy the occasional control freaks and the ego-chasers.

But the changes you’ll want to actually make are from the really smart and experienced folks whose input makes a genuine difference in the end product and your and the organization’s success.

So ask away for input, make meaningful changes, but don’t get snared in change for change sake alone. 😉

(Source Photo: here with attribution to Zentolos)