Outrage At Bogus Judge Baugh

Outrage At Bogus Judge Baugh

Injustice, Injustice does Montana Judge Todd Baugh pursue.

G-d, hope you are listening…

BBC reported about this bogus Judge Baugh who called a 14-year old girl that was raped by her 49-year old teacher, “as much in control of the situation” as the man who assaulted her.

The poor girl later committed suicide, which her mother probably rightfully attributed to the distress from the rape and aftermath.

And what does the judge do to mete out justice? He sentences the rapist to 15-years in prison AND suspends the sentence for all but 31 days with 1 day time already served.

The victim was raped and is dead and the rapist gets not 30-years, but 30 days!

While the judge who is under pressure to resign has all of a sudden expressed his deep remorse, it is almost unbelievable that this is someone charged with seeing that justice is served.

Shock, disbelief, outrage…what can you say about such a justice.

While there is certainly a time and place for empathy, compassion, and mercy–would anyone in their right mind, see this as one of those cases?

For all who believe that this world is not the end, but just the journey, I’d venture to guess that the 14-year old girl is not done either with her rapist or the judge who mocked her suffering and death.

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

When Desperation Turns Deadly

When Desperation Turns Deadly

It was shocking to read that suicide deaths in the U.S. have now surpassed deaths by motor vehicle accidents.

In 2010, there were over 38,000 suicides compared with almost 34,000 motor vehicle deaths (or 14.1 suicides per 100,000 people aged 10 and older versus 10.7 deaths from motor vehicles).

Motor vehicle deaths have been, thank G-d, declining since 1999, while suicides are unfortunately up by almost a third (31%).

Suicide for working adults were double other demographics (and highest for those in their 50’s), while for teens and the elderly, the rates stayed flat.

According to the Wall Street Journal (3 May 2012), for middle-age people 35-64, suicide is now the 4th highest cause of death after cancer, heart disease, and unintentional injury (e.g. drowning).

Suicide prevention efforts that have typically been directed to at-risk teenagers and the elderly are now being looked at for greater focus on middle-aged adults.

The article points to tough economic times (with the recession of 2007) as a potential factor in the increase.

I would assume also that the 10 years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan have contributed to the increase as well due to posttraumatic stress disorder.

Yet, suicide is a very final act of escape for those acutely suffering from economic hardships, the horrors of war, and depression–and we can only imagine how much pain these people must be feeling to do the unthinkable.

I am familiar with teenagers and adults taking or attempting suicide–some have survived and others have died.

For those lucky enough to survive, they have the opportunity to rebuild their lives and try again, while those who didn’t make it, their loved ones suffer with the emptiness that was once a loving and caring individual, part of their lives.

I was taught in Yeshiva that suicide is a very grave sin and people don’t have the right to take the life that G-d granted them, but in my mind, those who suffer so as to attempt or commit suicide are probably not in a state of mind or in full control of themselves to be fully responsible.

It is worth thinking about that if 38,000 actually commit suicide a year, how many more attempt it, contemplate it often, or otherwise consider it occasionally.

People need help coping. I remember learning in English class in college that “all men live lives of quiet desperation,” and I wonder how many are out there suffering inside–at times desperate, but usually putting a smile on their faces.

We need to look beyond the surface of what people are going through, have empathy, have mercy, and give plentifully of your time, and kindness to all–you may just be saving a desperate life from taking that one last and unforgiving step.

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

The Not Useless Machine–You!

This machine is hilarious. It is called the “useless machine,” well…because it is utterly useless.

When you push the switch to turn it on, it does only one thing–a lever comes out and hits the switch in the other direction to turn itself off and the lever retracts.

There is another version of this with eight switches (here), called the “advanced useless machine,” and it will turn all switches backed off–however many of the eight are turned on.

Why do we create such mind-numbing inventions?

Because,

– We can.

– It’s funny.

– It goes viral.

On some deeper level, I think we can connect to this idea of uselessness in parts of our mundane life–where we get into a habit, and basically do the same thing day after day–until we ask ourselves, where is the meaning of it all? Is our existence really important? Will anyone ever really care that we were even on this planet (for whatever period of life G-d grants us)?

Like this box, there are people and times when they just wish they could turn themselves off–some attempt it!

But we have to realize that we are given a choice every day to love and care for the ones we are blessed with, to do good selfless acts of kindness, and to try to give something back to the world–however big or small–even if it’s just a useless box that makes people laugh and introspect. 😉

Sorry Amanda Todd

Just watched this video with my daughter about Amanda Todd, the 15 year old girl from Canada who hung herself on Wednesday.

She made some mistakes with some guys–looks like she was taken advantage of–and then she was ruthlessly bullied, tormented, tagged, shamed, followed, beaten, and encouraged to kill herself.

After depression, anxiety, drugs, alcohol, cutting, and drinking bleach, she finally hung herself and is gone.

To those horrible people that pursued this young women and essentially murdered her–you are vile and disgusting and G-d will one day bring you to final judgment.

To the family of Amanda Todd, our heart, prayers, and sympathy goes out to you–your daughter and all decent people like her deserve better from society.

If we can only learn from this tragedy, perhaps her death will not have been in vain.

She wrote: “I have nobody. I need somebody. :(”

Hopefully, she is now with the heavenly father–and has not just somebody, but the one that matters the most.