Thank You, See Ya

Robot.jpeg

So one of our contractors was moving on to a new position.ย 


It was toward the end of the day, and I saw him getting ready to leave the building.


I went over to him to thank him for his service, tell him how we appreciated his contributions, and wish him well for the future.ย 


Someone nearby overhead me talking with him, and in a lighthearted joking way says, “That’s not what you told me about him by the elevators [one of our typical watercooler chat spots],” and then he gave a big smile.


He is another wonderful person and I understood he meant it in complete fun, but I couldn’t help feeling bad for the other person, and his thinking perhaps that people were talking bad about him somehow.ย 


I know I am a sensitive person, but somehow I could sort of feel the possible sting for the person leaving.


Sensing maybe something gone wrong, the other person came over afterwards and sort of apologized that he didn’t mean anything bad, which I knew of course.


We all like to have a good congenial relationship in the office, but I suppose even well-intentioned joshing around has to be thoughtful and with good timing. ๐Ÿ˜‰


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

A Prayer Of Thanks

Thank You
My sister-in-law sent over this beautiful prayer.



It is a prayer of thanks to the Almighty.



We thank G-d for:



Being with us and supporting us with his loving kindness.



– Challenges that teach us, help us appreciate all that we have, and are ultimately for our benefit.



– The wonderful life bestowed upon us and for always listening to to our prayers.ย 



If we concentrate on all that we have and not on what we don’t and recognize that everything G-d does is ultimately for the good, then we can gain strength, persist, and reach ever new heights!ย 



Hope you find hope and strength in this too. ๐Ÿ˜‰



(Special thanks to Sarah Herbsman for sharing this beautiful prayer.)

Good Spreads Good

good Samaritan
This was a nice note to see this morning at the parking garage.ย 



“To the good samaritan who picked up an Amex card on 11/3: Thank you! You are awesome.”



Look at how good deeds work and spread:



Someone lost their Amex credit card.



Another found it and went out of their way to take the time to safeguard it and turn it in.



The person who lost it then got to recognize the kind act and in turn make the effort to write this nice thank you note and post it.ย 



Other people passing this by get to see this and learn from it, and hopefully do similar nice things when they are presented the opportunity.



Do you look the other way and run off to do just your own (selfish) things or do you take the time to help others when they are in need? ย 



The answer may not be obvious to everyone or all the time, but we can all learn and grow. ๐Ÿ˜‰



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Recongition Inspires

Recongition Inspires

Thought this was really nice at Starbucks.

A place to show respect and recognize your colleagues.

How often to we take others for granted for what they do–oh, it’s their job or as one boss used to say coldy and harshly that their employees’ recognition is that they get a paycheck every 2 weeks!

But people are not machines–they have feeelings, they need to be motivated, inspired, and appreciated.

And recognition doesn’t just come from the chain of command, but from peers, customers, and other stakeholders.

We can do a good deed simply be recognizing the hardwork that people make on our behalf, for the customer, or the organization more broadly.

Taking people for granted is the easy way out.

But saying a genuine thank you and placing a card of recognition in the pocket of the posterboard or otherwise showing your appreciation with an award, a letter of gratitude, or telling people they “did good”–takes an extra effort, but one definitely worth it! ๐Ÿ˜‰

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Playing For The Meal

Playing For The Meal

I love this guitarist on the corner with the sign that says, “To eat for today one must play for the meal. You Pay. Thank you.”

Five communication lessons I had reinforced from this:

– Be direct–he is right to the point…he plays, you pay–that’s the deal.

– Be clear–the writing is large, the letters are distinct, and easy to read…you get it!

– Be concise–the message fits on a small cardboard…no rambling placards, just the message next to the guitar case for collecting the money.

– Be purposeful–he states the reason for his being there right up front…he’s hungry and is willing to work for it!

– Be courteous–he ends with a nice thank you that is set off to the side in script.

If his playing is half as good as his message…he’s earned his meal. ๐Ÿ˜‰

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)