Amazing – They Go In And See

Had my routine colonoscopy this morning. 


It is so amazing that they can go in with camera and everything. 


Look around and if necessary, cut out anything bad. 


Years ago, people just felt sick or pain and maybe saw some symptoms from outside.


But they had no idea what was happening inside. 


So grateful to G-d for the technology and doctors that can make sure all is okay. 


We are truly living in miraculous times. 


They even send you home with some pictures afterward.


It’s interesting to see, but maybe a little TMI. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

People Nutrition

Nutrition.jpeg

This is an risque t-shirt this lady is wearing.


It’s a big nutrition label. 


And she’s wrapped in it!


I’m not sure if this is a gag or fashion statement or even a sexual thing.


Is she advertising that she’s like the food?


What was really funny though is by her butt…it says 


“Moschino chocolate tastes good.”


Maybe that should be a black box warning!


Uh, this is way too much information for me. 😉


(Source Photo: Dannielle Blumenthal)

Purple Hair Day

Purple
This lady in line at Starbucks apparently likes purple, a lot. 

 
It seems a pretty common favorite among many women.
 
One that I know claims she ALWAYS wears something with purple.
 
When I saw her a couple of times seemingly without any purple clothing or accessories, I asked innocently, “So no purple today?”
 
She replied with a big grin, “Oh, it’s there!”
 
Yikes, TMI–don’t ask so many questions. 😉
 
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

When TMI Is PC

Zombie_lego

An interesting editorial in the New York Times (19 August 2012) bemoans the state of affairs in the workplace, where generation Y’ers, take the liberty of sharing too much [personal] information (TMI) with others.

The author, Peggy Klaus, gives examples of young workers talking about their looking for other positions, recounting family birthing experiences, or discussing sexual exploits or a shortage thereof.

Klaus see this as a carryover of people’s online social behavior or what she calls “Facebook in your face”–where you “tell everybody everything”–whether appropriate or important, or not at all!

Similarly, this behavior is viewed by some as young people simply acting out what they learned from their helicopter parents–who instilled “an overblown sense of worth” on them–where every poop is worth sharing from infancy through adulthood.

Ms. Klaus refers to this as O.S.D. or Obsessive Sharing Disorder–and she instead calls for “decency, common sense, and just plain good manners” in deciding what to share and when.

While I agree with a certain amount of base political correctness and decorum in the office, I think too much control (TMC) over our workforce is not a good thing.

We cannot expect people to fit in, be enthusiastic about coming to work, and be innovative and productive in their jobs–when they have to constantly be on guard–watching what they say and what they do, and worrying about making any mistake.

Assuming that people are not doing anything that hurts themselves or others, I think we should give people more room to breath, be themselves, and to self-actualize.

Holding the reins too tightly on workers, risks developing a cookie-cutter workforce–where everyone must look-alike, talk-alike, and think-alike–like virtual automatons–and such a telling and controlling environment destroys the very motivated, creative, and entrepreneurial workforce we desire and need to be globally competitive and individually fulfilled.

Best practices for teleworking, flexible work schedules, and clubs and activities at work that let people be human and themselves–makes for a happier, more committed, and more productive workforce.

Creating climates of workplace sterility, and fear and intimidation for every miscued word or imperfect deed–is neither realistic for human beings that are prone to make mistakes–nor conducive to learning and growing to be the best that each person can be.

I am not a generation Y’er, but I appreciate people who are real, words that are sincere, and deeds that are their personal best–whether it’s the way I would do it or not.

Yes, don’t talk and act stupid at work–and shame yourself or others with hateful or abusive behavior–but do feel free to be honestly you as an individual and as a contributor to the broader team–that is better than a zombie army of worker bees who faithfully watch every word and constrain every deed.

(Source Photo: here with attribution to Irregular Shed)

>E-memory and Meat Memory

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As we move towards a “paperless society” and migrate our data to the computer and the Internet, we can find personal profiles, resumes, photos, videos, emails, documents, presentations, news items, scanned copies of diplomas and awards, contact lists, and even financial, tax, and property records.

People have so much information on the web (and their hard drive) these days that they fear one of two things happening:

  1. Their hard drive will crash and they will lose all their valuable information.
  2. Someone will steal their data and their identity (identity theft)

For each of these, people are taking various precautions to protect themselves such as backing up their data and regularly and carefully checking financial and credit reports.

Despite some risks of putting “too much information” out there, the ease of putting it there, and the convenience of having it there—readily available—is driving us to make the Internet our personal storage device.

One man is taking this to an extreme. According to Wired Magazine (September 2009), Gordon Bell is chronicling his life—warts and all—online. He is documenting his online memory project—MyLifeBits—in a book, called Total Recall.

“Since 2001, Bell has been compulsively scanning, capturing and logging each and every bit of personal data he generates in his daily life. The trove includes Web Sites he’s visited (22,173), photos taken (56,282), docs written and read (18,883), phone conversations had (2,000), photos snapped by SenseCam hanging around his neck (66,000), songs listened to (7,139) and videos taken by (2,164). To collect all this information, he uses a staggering assortment of hardware: desktop scanner, digicam, heart rate monitor, voice recorder, GPS logger, pedometer, Smartphone, e-reader.”

Mr. Bell’s thesis is that “by using e-memory as a surrogate for meat-based memory, we free our minds to engage in more creativity, learning, and innovation.”

Honestly, with all the time that Bell spends capturing and storing his memories, I don’t know how he has any time left over for anything creative or otherwise.

Some may say that Gordon Bell has sort of an obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)—you think? Others that he is some sort of genius that is teaching the world to be free and open to remembering—everything!

Personally, I don’t think that I want to remember “everything”. I can dimly remember some embarrassing moments in elementary school and high school that I most sure as heck want to forget. And then there are some nasty people that would be better off buried in the sands of time. Also, some painful times of challenge and loss—that while may be considered growth experiences—are not something that I really want on the tip of my memory or in a file folder on my hard drive or a record in a database.

It’s good to remember. It’s also sometimes good to forget. In my opinion, what we put online should be things that we want or need to remember or access down the road. I for one like to go online every now and then and do some data cleanup (and in fact there are now some programs that will do this automatically). What I thought was worthwhile, meaningful, or important 6 months or a year ago, may not evoke the same feelings today. Sometimes, like with purchases I made way back when, I think to myself, what was I thinking when I did that? And I quickly hit the delete key (wishing I could do the same with those dumb impulse purchases!). Most of the time, I am not sorry that I did delete something old and I am actually happy it is gone. Occasionally, when I delete something by accident, then I start to pull my hair out and run for the backup—hoping that it really worked and the files are still there.

In the end, managing the hard drive takes more work then managing one’s memories, which we have little conscious control over. Between the e-memory and the meat memory, perhaps we can have more of what we need and want to remember and can let go and delete the old and undesired one—and let bygones be bygones.