You Are The Working Class

So I like to speak with people about their lives.


Today at breakfast, there was a gentlemen working the egg bar making omelettes for people.


Recognizing him, I said “You’ve been here a number of years?”


He responds, “Yeah, but I want to leave here!”


I was sort of taken aback at his bluntness, and inquired further, “Why, is everything okay?”


He goes, “Not really. They’ll only give me work 6 to 7 hours a day, and I can’t make a living on 32 hours a week!”


I asked innocently, “Do you have a second job or something?”


He says, “No, this is it,” and proceeded to make the next person’s omelette.


Feeling sort of shitty bad for him…


Another lady who works the tables says to us: “I won’t be seeing you.”


I ask, “Why–are you off the next few days?”


She says, “No, I don’t come back until next Saturday–I only work the weekends here, and somewhere else on weekdays.”


Wondering about this, I say: “So you work 7 days a week?”


She answers, “Yes, year-round!”


After we said goodbye until next time, I looked at my wife grimacing that this women has to work 7 days a week, 365 days a year, just to earn a basic living.


I’ll tell you the system is broken.


Shareholders and corporate chieftains squeeze profits and earnings per share out of their companies while the workers can barely get by.


The workers are not part of the companies they labor for–they are merely hired hands who will be replaced in a moment by another minimum wage worker if they but open their mouths to protest one word.


Slavery did not end in building the Great Pyramids of Egypt or in the plantations of the South–the average worker is still just a slave.


Employee engagement and development and “Human Capital” are terms organizations use to make themselves and their workers believe that there is real caring and unity going on.


But we know the truth by how people are treated with harshness, disrespect, disdain, and even abuse–sexual and otherwise!


Yeah, are you really valued or are you a wage slave showered with empty platitudes of unity and caring.


Real leadership is genuine compassion, empathy, and helping people both inside and outside the organization–not just a guise, disguise, mask for making just another dollar cracking the whip on the backs of the underclass.


All people are important.


All people deserve a living wage.


All people are entitled to work with dignity and respect.


All people need to be apart of a system that is fair and equitable.


Care for your brothers and sisters for one day you will be called before them in the court of Heaven and they will speak the final truth to power. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Falling On The Sword

Fall On Sword.jpeg

Sometimes things happen that we don’t agree with or like. 


We may even get blamed for them when we didn’t do anything wrong. 


At times like these, there comes up inside of us a strong visceral feeling to speak up and out–to right the wrongs!


There are times when we can, but there are also times when it may be better to hold our tongue for another day. 


In the olden times, people that spoke out, often had their tongue cut right out in front of them–no questions asked.


These days, thank G-d, most people may not be that cruel, but still people get punished for speaking truth to power–when the power is tone deaf or possibly even behaving more as brutal dictators than as benevolent leaders. 


The problem for the average Joe is that there is no point in losing your tongue or even your head by acting rashly or imprudently.


Better to wait and plan for the right moment to be effective and stand with integrity for your ideals and what you know in your heart is right. 


Maybe even at times, we have to fall on our swords until we can make a strong and convincing case and change both hearts and minds to betterment. 


The point is not only to do what’s right, but to make things right in the world around us.


Swords too often can come out swinging wildly, unless we carefully sharpen them and practice our lunges and cuts, and work to repair the wrongs in the world as soldiers of righteousness. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Clothing Optional

Empress Has No Clothes.jpeg

This was a funny painting in the gallery. 

A naked lady with a big colorful sun hat on. 

Be careful you don’t want to get too much sun!

The painting also makes me think of the saying “The empress (or emperor) has no clothes.”

The leader thinks they are wearing beautiful clothes, but the reality is they are naked in front of their subjects. 

People see when their leaders are shelling out a clouded vision, tempting them with empty (campaign) promises, or pushing ideas that don’t hold water in the real world, but often people are simply too afraid to say anything.

Instead, they acknowledge the beautiful clothes or brilliant ideas that aren’t there and in groupthink fashion, they fail to call out the folly for what it is, when it is. 

Naked is naked, and we should say the truth albeit with respect and in a constructive way, if we really want to make genuine collective progress. 

True–lauding or blinding following what simply isn’t there and has no substance may land you a seat at the royal table, but what good is it, if you are sitting with some leaders that may be nothing more than naked idiots. 😉

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Traits To Be Prez

The personality to be President:


1. Experience, Diplomacy


2. Direct, Honest, Strong, Results-oriented


3. Passionate, Dedication, Survival of the Nation


A short interview with Andy Blumenthal


(Source Video: Dannielle Blumenthal)

Be Relevant, Live!

Irrelevant
“Hello Irrelevant. My name is Andy.”



The photo above was taken today near a prominent university in Washington, D.C. 



When our youngsters in the Capital of the United States–the holders of future creativity and energy are feeling irrelevant–we as a country are in serious trouble. 



Yet, don’t we all feel irrelevant at times?



We see and hear so much that is somehow wrong in the world and feel powerless to stop it, change it, or do anything about it that really makes a difference. 



Everyday we are witness to people’s personal misdeeds that should never be done, let alone contempalted; large, medium, and even smaller organizations doing the wrong thing for profit or power; and governments making decisions for political reasons and not common sense reasons, or for the good of the people. 



And how do we feel in all this — relevant or irrelevant? 



Can we as people endowed with G-d’s lifeforce and heavenly spirit, formulate a position that touches people’s hearts and minds to do the right thing for the right reasons–and can we speak it articulately enough, loud enough, convincingly enough to make a genuine difference?



Just as a single example in today’s Wall Street Journal, an editorial about Yucca Mountain, the place designated for nuclear waste disposal–that is supposed to meet safety requirements for the next “million years” (I think most of us would be happy if we achieve even half that estimate)–and has already cost us 30 years of study and $15 billion, but yet continues to remain stuck in a politcial quagmire–why?



I beleive we can all think of numerous health, safey, and wellbeing issues affecting us, our families, communities, and this country that are are in a similar state of paralysis and dysfunction. 



Why can’t we move forward–is there no one relevant out there anymore?



We can’t afford to let ourselves sink into feelings of despair, inadequancy, or irrelevancy to the great tasks at hand–whether from things like Ebola, ISIS, or financial meltdown. 



We must find our inner voices, our moral rectitude, and our courage to speak truth to power, to stand firm for right against wrong.



It’s understable to feel irrelevant, but it’s not sustainable to show it. 😉 



(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

To Archive Or Not

To Archive Or Not

Farhad Manjoo had a good piece in the Wall Street Journal on the Forever Internet vs. the Erasable Internet.

The question he raises is whether items on the Internet should be archived indefinitely or whether we should be able to delete postings.

Manjoo uses the example of Snapshot where messages and photos disappear a few seconds after the recipient opens them–a self-destruct feature.

It reminded me of Mission Impossible, where each episode started with the tape recording of the next mission’s instructions that would then self-destruct in five seconds…whoosh, gone.

I remember seeing a demo years ago of an enterprise product that did this for email messages–where you could lock down or limit the capability to print, share, screenshot, or otherwise retain messages that you sent to others.

It seemed like a pretty cool feature in that you could communicate what you really thought about something–instead of an antiseptic version–without being in constant fear that it would be used against you by some unknown individual at some future date.

I thought, wow, if we had this in our organizations, perhaps we could get more honest ideas, discussion, vetting, and better decision making if we just let people genuinely speak their minds.

Isn’t that what the First Amendment is really all about–“speaking truth to power”(of course, with appropriate limits–you can’t just provoke violence, incite illegal actions, damage or defame others, etc.)?

Perhaps, not everything we say or do needs to be kept for eternity–even though both public and private sector organizations benefit from using these for “big data” analytics for everything from marketing to national security.

Like Manjoo points out, when we keep each and every utterance, photo, video, and audio, you create a situation where you have to “constantly police yourself, to create a single, stultifying profile that restricts spontaneous self-expression.”

While one one hand, it is good to think twice before you speak or post–so that you act with decency and civility–on the other hand, it is also good to be free to be yourself and not a virtual fake online and in the office.

Some things are worth keeping–official records of people, places, things, and events–especially those of operational, legal or historical significance and even those of sentimental value–and these should be archived and preserved in a time appropriate way so that we can reference, study, and learn from them for their useful lives.

But not everything is records-worthy, and we should be able to decide–within common sense guidelines for records management, privacy, and security–what we save and what we keep online and off.

Some people are hoarders and others are neat freaks, but the point is that we have a choice–we have freedom to decide whether to put that old pair of sneakers in a cardboard box in the garage, trash it, or donate it.

Overall, I would summarize using the photo in this post of the vault boxes, there is no need to store your umbrella there–it isn’t raining indoors. 😉

(Source Photo: here with attribution to Spinster Cardigan)