Our Forefathers Were Planners And So Are We

Thank you to Rabbi Haim Ovadia for his speech today at Magen David Synagogue on the topic of how our forefathers in the Bible were planners and so are we today. (Note: some of the thoughts below are directly from Rabbi Ovadia and others are added by me.)


In the Biblical story of Jacob, there are numerous examples teaching us the importance of planning.


1) Shepherds vs Hunters:  Jacob was a shepherd versus his brother Esau who was a hunter.  Shepherds have a long-term outlook with their animals, tending to them and caring for them over the long-term, while hunters go out for the kills to eat for that day. 


2) Working for Rachel and Leah vs. Selling the Pottage:  Jacob worked for 7 years for Rachel and another 7 for Leah–this was the long-term view and commitment to work for Lavan in order to marry his daughters. In comparison, Esau came in hungry from the field and sold his birthright for the immediate gratification of a bowl of pottage.


3) The Plan to Take Esau’s Blessing: Rebekah worked with Jacob to prepare meat for Isaac and put hair and clothes on Jacob that made him look and seem like Esau, so Jacob could get the blessing from Isaac, while Esau was still out hunting in the field. 


4) Dividing his Camp in Two: Jacob sent messengers (i.e. reconnaissance) to see and plan for what Esau was doing in coming to meet him. When the messengers returned with word that Esau was coming with 400 men, Jacob planned for the worst, dividing his camp in two, so should one peril the other could survive. Additionally, Jacob prayed and sent rounds of gifts to Esau and also presented himself to Esau before his beloved wife Rachel and son Joseph in the safety of the rear. 


Long-term planning has been fundamental to the Jewish people throughout history and to modern times:


1) “People of the Book” – The Jewish people are known as “the people off the book” for the devotion to Torah study, learning, and continually investing in education, which is a view for long-term investment and success.   


2) Good Deeds to Inherit The World To Come – Fundamental to Jewish belief is that this earthly world is just a “corridor” to the World to Come.  We do charity and good deeds, not only because it’s the right thing to do (certainly!), but also because we believe that these merits will help us long-term when we pass, and go to the spiritual next world, Heaven. 


3) Believing and Praying for the Return to The Promised Land – For 2,000, the Jewish people never gave up hoping and praying on the deliverance of G-d’s promise to return them from exile to the Promised Land.  This was a long-term view that helped sustain the Jewish people throughout their far-flung exile and through millennium of persecution and genocide.

Ezekiel 11:17: “Thus says the Lord God: I will gather you from the peoples, and assemble you out of the countries where you have been scattered, and I will give you the land of Israel.”

4) Waiting 6,000 years for the Messiah: For 6,000 years, the Jews have maintain faith and plan for the coming of the Messiah, the rebuilding of the Temple and the ultimate redemption of the world.  

“(Ani Ma’amin) I believe in complete faith in the coming of the Messiah…Even tough he may tarry, none-the-less, I will wait for him.”

Like our forefathers, it is critical to maintain faith in the Almighty and practice long-term planning as keys to success in life. 


If we take the long-view, we can overcome so many short-term challenges, obstacles and even suffering–believing, praying planning, and doing for a better, brighter future. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

5-Minute Intervals

This was sunrise at 5-minute intervals. 


All I can think is how glorious G-d is and how marvelous his creation.


– The light of the L-rd chases the darkness away.


– The might of the L-rd brings forth a new day. 


– The right hand of the L-rd shows us all the correct way. 


How are your works so majestic indeed. 


All we can do is gaze with eyes wide.


Truly the perfection of the L-rd is shown in his creation. 


We are blessed to see and experience it.


Every day is a miracle that we have in this world.


Even with pain and sorrow, our soul clings to this life. 


Until such time that our Maker calls us home to Him once more. 


Then we gasp our last breath and enter his Heavenly abode. 


For this world is just a corridor to the true world that is to come. 


And so just imagine what that must be like to be even closer to G-d and his endless loving majesty. 😉


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Not Just Business

Park And Pay
This was a funny sign on the parking meter.



“All May Park. All Must Pay.”



Another way of saying this is like at the dry cleaners, “No tickee, no shirtee!”



This reminded me of a conversation that I was having with some colleagues about whether individuals or organizations can be evil?



(Note: True story, but I’ve embellished for the sake of demonstration.)



One colleague said, “Individuals are not bad, but people in groups definitely [often] turn bad!”



Another said, “No individuals can be bad, really bad–think of Hitler and so many others who have murdered, tortured, raped, enslaved, and impoverished–it’s the individuals that can and do turn an organizational culture bad.”



A third person replied that, “Indeed, it can be the other way around as well, where bad organizations make or encourage it’s people to do the wrong things–whether for profits, power, or punishment.”



Then someone blurted out, “Well, business is business, right?” In other words, it’s okay to do something wrong because everyone does it in business–that’s the name of the game and what you have to do to compete and survive!



Then I said sort of annoyed at what the last person said, “Business is not business–that is our test to be G-dly, moral, and ethical in all our dealings [in our personal and professional lives]”



Of course, we don’t always succeed–no one does/we are not angels–but we have to try every time, learn and grow and become better people. 



If you do wrong, you will pay–whether in this world or the next. 😉